4K is for Fanboys

4K is for Fanboys

I feel as if I might have a reputation around these parts, a heel of sorts. Why a heel and not a hero? Because I find that my opinions are often in opposition to that of my contemporaries. Not because they are wrong, but just because I think their focus is continually on things, topics, and ideas that play to a base that, well, is dying.

 

Dennis Burger wrote a terrific piece on why 4K isn’t always 4K. It is a truly good piece of writing and one that gets 99 percent of the argument absolutely correct. For as someone who has literally filmed a feature-length film for a motion-picture studio in 

true 4K only to have it shown in theaters in 2K, I can attest to the article’s validity. But Dennis, like me some years ago, missed the boat by even framing the argument around resolution at all.

 

You see, I thought people/viewers cared about things like resolution. Back in 2008, when I filmed my movie, the original RED ONE cinema camera just came out, and as a result the “whole world” was clamoring for 4K—or so it seemed. I had the choice of whether or not to film in 4K via the RED ONE or go with a more known entity by filming in 2K via cameras from Sony’s CineAlta line. Ultimately I chose option C, and went with a true dark horse contender 

in Dalsa, who up and to that point, had no cinema pedigree—unless you count being the ones who designed the sensor tech for the Mars Rover a cinematic endeavor. But I digress.

 

We didn’t use the RED ONE because it was buggier than a roadside motel mattress, and I didn’t choose to side with Sony because they were HD, and HD was yesterday’s news. Filming in 4K via the Dalsa back in 2008 was an absolute pain in the ass. (That’s me with the Dalsa Origin II in the photo at the right.) Spoiler alert, not much has changed in 2019, as 4K 

continues to be a bit of a pain, it’s just more accessible, which makes everyone think that they need it—more on that in a moment.

 

What is upsetting is that I do know the monetary difference my need to satiate the consumer-electronics fanboys cost me and my film—a quarter of a million dollars. While $250,000 isn’t much in Hollywood terms, it represented over a quarter of my film’s total budget. The cost of filming in HD you ask? Less than $30,000. Oh, and post production 

4K is for Fanboys

would’ve taken half the time—thus lowering costs further. All of that headache, backache, and money only to have the film bow in 2K via 4K digital projectors from—wait for it—Sony!

 

Now, I will sort of agree with the assertion that capturing visuals at a higher resolution or quality and downscaling to a lesser format—say HD—will result in a clearer or better picture—but honestly, only if you preface what you’re watching as such ahead of time. Which brings me to my point: All of this HD vs. 4K talk is for fanboys who insist on watching pixels and specs rather than watch the damn movie. Not one person, or journalist (apart from me), wrote about my film from the context of being the first-feature length film ever filmed entirely in 4K. They didn’t ask about it, nor care, because it doesn’t matter.

 

It never mattered.

 

What digital has done is remove the magic from cinema and replace it with a bunch of numbers that bored middle-aged dudes (yes, dudes) can masturbate over in an attempt to differentiate their lot from the rest. None of it has any bearing on the story, enjoyment, or skill. It’s an arms race, one we all fall prey to, and one we continually perpetuate, because, well, it sells. We’ve gotten away from cinema theory, history, and storytelling in recent years and instead become infatuated with bit-rates, color spaces, and codecs. And yet, in the same breath, so many of us bitch about why there are no good films being made anymore. It’s because the only thing audiences will pay for is what they think is going to look great on their brand new UltraHD TV.

Andrew Robinson

Andrew Robinson is a photographer and videographer by trade, working on commercial
and branding projects all over the US. He has served as a managing editor and
freelance journalist in the AV space for nearly 20 years, writing technical articles,
product reviews, and guest speaking on behalf of several notable brands at functions
around the world.

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