Greyhound

Greyhound

Apple TV+ snatched up Tom Hanks’ latest, Greyhound, as an exclusive for its relatively new streaming service after the film was moved from its original March 22 theatrical release date to May 8 and then to June 12. Apple has been looking for that “killer app” original programming to bolster and broaden its streaming offerings, and this Sony Pictures-produced World War II thriller is a strong choice. And at an estimated budget of $50.3 million, this is one of the biggest films to get a direct-to-streaming release thus far (unless you count the $75 million Disney paid for the worldwide rights to Hamilton).

Hanks is no stranger to starring in war films (Saving Private Ryan, Band of Brothers, Forrest Gump) or movies where water plays an integral role (Cast Away, Captain Phillips, Sully), and here he combines the two, playing Ernest Krause, a captain in the U.S. Navy commanding a World War II-era Fletcher-class destroyer (call sign “Greyhound”) on his first mission, leading a convoy of 37 Allied ships crossing the Atlantic loaded with soldiers and supplies for the front lines.

 

P.T. Barnum is credited with saying, “Always leave them wanting more,” and that is what I thought when Greyhound’s end credits started rolling. The film’s actual run time (less credits) is a brisk 81 minutes, making it feel a bit more like an episode in a series than a standalone feature film. Fortunately, it uses nearly each of those minutes to full potential, zipping by with a very tight story that contains virtually no fat.

GREYHOUND AT A GLANCE

This movie isn’t big on character development, but it does give you a great sense of what it was like to command a ship under siege by U-boats during World War II. 

 

PICTURE     

HDR helps enhance the details in the film’s predominantly grey color palette while making it more vivid.

 

SOUND

The Dolby Atmos mix helps capture the sense of a ship under attack, with sound waves from depth-charge explosions pressurizing your room and hitting you in the chest.

The movie begins by informing us of a treacherous area of the Atlantic beyond the range of Allied air cover known as the “Black Pit,” where German submarines—U-boats—hunt Allied convoys in lethal groups known as a “Wolfpack.” The multi-day crossing during the Battle of the Atlantic saw over 3,500 ships carrying millions of tons of cargo sunk, with over 72,000 souls lost. While the story is based on actual events, Greyhound is not a true story. Hanks actually penned the screenplay—his first feature-film writing credit since That Thing You Do! in 1996—based on C.S. Forester’s 1955 novel The Good Shepherd.

 

What is lost is any sort of character development. We learn nothing about anyone, and just get bits and pieces of information about Krause, who appears religious (he makes a point of praying several times) and whose sole motivation is to get as much of the convoy safely across the Atlantic as possible.

 

The one bit of backstory we do get before Krause ships off is that he wants to propose to his girlfriend Evelyn (Elisabeth Shue) on a beach, but that relationship—or any other—is never developed. In retrospect, this opening scene, in which Evelyn and Krause exchange Christmas presents, seems to be in the film solely as an opportunity for Krause to explain that he has finally been given command of his first destroyer before he heads off to training and then into active duty.

 

Besides that brief scene, the film maintains a laser focus on the Greyhound, and features Hanks in nearly every shot. We see the other ships in the convoy, but they are usually shown in the distance either via Krause’s view through binoculars or from high aerial shots. Krause communicates with other ships over the radios, but we never see crew aboard any other ships. We see the periscope, decks, and conning of the Wolfpack subs that crest and slice through the waters like a hunting shark’s fin—and even hear the “Grey Wolf” sub taunting Krause and the Greyhound over the radio—but the enemy remains faceless.

 

The short running time and focusing nearly entirely on Krause allows you to fully appreciate the absolute weight of command as he is forced to make virtually every decision, skipping meals and sleep during the treacherous crossing, and making life-and-death choices—either for himself or others in the convoy—nearly every minute. In some ways, the tightness and claustrophobic nature of many of the interiors aboard the Greyhound are reminiscent of a submarine film, but here we see the flip side of the coin, hunting the unseen sub, and launching patterns of depth charges and watching them explode the surface of the water instead of being inside the sub as they explode all around.

 

The film delivers an accurate portrayal of operations aboard a warship, with lots of orders being given then repeated back, multiple announcements of bearings and headings, and lots of navigation change orders in the form of left/right full/hard/standard rudder.

 

The CGI effects and attention to detail are impressive throughout, and short of an opening shot where a circling plane just looked a tad off, nothing pulls you out of the film.

 

Filmed in DXL Raw at 8K resolution, Greyhound is sourced from a true 4K digital intermediate, and the image quality is sharp and detailed throughout. Closeups reveal tons of detail, whether the pores in actors’ faces, the pebbled texture on helmets, the thick, heavy wool of a peacoat, or the detail on the ship’s instrumentation.

 

Viewers with capable displays can enjoy a Dolby Vision presentation; however, I was limited to HDR10. While much of the film is grey and gloomy—the ships, the ocean, the skies, even the drab olive greens of the sailors’ uniforms—there are still plenty of benefits from the added dynamic range, which generally creates more depth and realism. Whether it is bright light streaming into darkened interiors through port holes, pops of light from the ship’s instruments or interior lighting, emergency distress flares piercing the black night sky, or the bright red flames rolling out of ships on fire, images have plenty of punch when called for.

 

Sonically, the Dolby Atmos mix is fairly active with lots of atmospheric sounds to place you in the scene and aboard the ship. Whether inside the ship or on the deck, you hear waves crashing, the creaks and groans of the ship, the howl of the wind, the pings from the sonar room, PA announcements echoing through the overhead speakers, and off-camera voices.

 

Your subwoofer is also called on frequently to deliver some tactile bass, whether from waves rolling through the room, splashing up high on the front wall and overhead, and then crashing with bassy authority, or the ship’s engines thrumming with appropriate weight, or the deck guns engaging U-boats with a boom that you’ll feel in your seat. The biggest bass moments come from the explosion of depth charges, which will cause a good subwoofer to pressurize the air in the room and let you feel it in your chest.

 

Dialogue is mostly clear and intelligible—however, there are some moments where it’s a tad muffled, but this is usually coming from or in the sonar room with much going on.

 

Greyhound does not require much of a commitment in the way of time, but will definitely be enjoyable for those who like Hanks and/or WWII dramas, and it is streaming now for free on Apple TV+ (subscription required).

John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

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