Author:admin

12 Music Streams for Every Taste

It may be the worst of times right now, but in an odd way it’s the best of times for home entertainment as a multitude of fascinating new live-entertainment templates are emerging. Musicians have been performing from their bedrooms and home studios, some even figuring out ways to collaborate all while staying in their safe spaces. Many organizations are opening their archives with previously unreleased recorded performances of plays, operas, and musicals. Heck, there are even global virtual music festivals happening!

 

Here are some current faves—some upcoming, others that may be archived. I’ve tried to focus on performances that offer higher production values but do recognize that in some instances you may well see and hear performers broadcasting via their cellphones! Amazingly, the results are often a lot better than you might expect and no doubt the performances are unique.

 

In each of these recommendations, click on the subhead to jump to the event link. (For those who want to dig deeper, I have written overviews of performances from the lockdown for Audiophile Review.)

12 Music Livestreams for Every Taste
THEATER

The Show Must Go On

Andrew Lloyd Webber, the musical force behind Cats, Jesus Christ Superstar, Evita, and so many other hit Broadway shows, has a weekly program of free showings of one of his musicals. Called The Show Must Go On, each program is available for 48 hours, so you can tune in whenever you like over the weekend! I watched some of Cats and it looked quite wonderful. Judging from the quality of the trailers shown on the program’s YouTube page, I suspect most will be fairly high quality productions. There is also a full two-hour show archived from Webber’s Royal Albert Hall Celebration.

12 Music Streams for Every Taste
JAZZ

International Jazz Day

On April 30th, Herbie Hancock hosted an event bringing together the jazz music communities around the world called International Jazz Day Virtual Global Concert 2020. Literally featuring artists from across the globe, streamed live via jazzday.com, the concert includes performances by John McLaughlin, Cécile McLorin Salvant, Aretha Franklin, Stevie Wonder, Marcus Miller, Jane Monheit, John Scofield, Dee Dee Bridgewater, and Joey DeFrancesco. I have watched some of this 720p video stream and it is a wonder. Generally, the fidelity is excellent and the video quality quite remarkable, especially when you see upwards of 20 musicians jamming together on screen from their homes. Even Charlie Puth performing on his keyboard through his computer from his bedroom sounds wonderful. One of my favorite moments is South Korean jazz singer Youn Sun Nah doing “My Favorite Things” on a kalimba (i.e., finger piano)—a wonderfully poignant performance.

 

SF Jazz Fridays At Five

San Francisco Jazz has started a new weekly subscription series called Fridays at Five, broadcasting one-hour Happy Hour concerts from their exclusive archives. The lineup looks impressive, with Friday May 8th including guitar wizard Bill Frisell and saxophonist Joe Lovano from 2019. I suspect these will be professionally shot high-quality productions and, having seen several shows at the venue, I can attest to its fantastic acoustics and lighting. Other scheduled shows include Wayne Shorter Celebrations (with Herbie Hancock, Terence Blanchard, Kamasi Washington, Terrace Martin, Danilo Pérez, John Patitucci, and Brian Blade), Chucho Valdés and Irakere 45, and Rhiannon Giddens and Francesco Turris. For the $5 entry fee, this seems like a great value and an excellent way to support the jazz community.

 

Jazz Foundation of America Live

Broadcast in conjunction with relix.com, this live concert is a benefit for the Jazz Foundation Musicians’ Emergency Fund. The virtual concert—called Jazz Foundation of America Livefeatures an incredible lineup, including Bettye LaVette, Sheryl Crow, Robert Cray, Elvis Costello, Milton Nascimento, Anjelique Kidjo, Stanley Jordan, and Ivan Neville performing form their homes and via archived previously recorded live concerts. The show was originally supposed to just be broadcast a second time but seems to be up on Relix’s YouTube page as one six-hour continuous program, so hopefully it will stay there for a while for all to enjoy and to continue benefitting this organization’s noble mission.

 

Tuck and Patti

This magnificent jazz duo performs regularly via Facebook through their computer, literally from their living room couch! Tuck and Patti feature Tuck’s gorgeous, rich jazz-guitar work and Patti’s remarkable vocals. Each show I have seen has been a joy, and you can contribute to their virtual tip jar as well (which you should!). Many of their performances are archived at their Facebook page. You can also reach them via their website

12 Music Streams for Every Taste
ROCK/BLUES

New York Guitar Festival

If you want some blues love, this series may be your virtual ticket. Currently focusing on the legendary Reverend Gary Davis, it includes stay-at-home/studio performances by some of the greatest blues/folk guitar pickers of our times. I first got introduced to Davis’ music via Jorma Kaukonen (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna), who turns in a great version of “I Am the Light of This World” from his Fur Peace Ranch. The amazing duo Larkin Poe offer up a searing “Say No to the Devil” and Fantastic Negrito offers a wonderful “Candyman.”  Bill Frisell’s beautiful “Twelve Gates to the City” is ethereal and haunting, as one might expect from this artist. Much joy here, most of it streaming in 1080p quality on YouTube. Many of these artists have nice home studio setups so the sound is generally solid. The music is sublime.

 

The Rolling Stones’ Extra Licks

England’s once-newest hitmakers have announced their Extra Licks! weekly digital archive series on YouTube, which sounds quite promising. Tied in to YouTube’s #StayHome campaign, the Rolling Stones series began May 3rd with the acclaimed 2016 Latin America Ole! Tour video. Future programming will stream six concert films from throughout their career, including performances from the 1994 Voodoo Lounge Tour.

 

BBC Stay Home Live Lounge

The BBC has pulled together a big roster of artists from around the globe for its Live Lounge program. The Stay Home Live Lounge got off to a super wonderful start with some of the music industry’s biggest stars collaborating on a cover of the Foo Fighters’ “Times Like These” to raise money for charities. Net profits will go towards The Who’s COVID-19-Solidarity Response Fund. On this one video are not only The Foo Fighters themselves but cameos from more than 20 other stars from around the globe. It’s a wonderful performance.

 

The Mavericks’ Raul Malo: Quarantunes Playlist

Imagine hearing 20 joyous cover tunes done by The Mavericks’ glorious singer Raul Malo from his studio-enhanced home office. Now imagine him playing most of these songs on his Mellotron emulator with all manner of fun pre-programmed rhythm beds and you can imagine it’s a special brew of recordings. I won’t be surprised if he puts these tracks out as an album. But it is really fun watching his videos, which include covers of “All of Me,” “Besame Mucho,” “Ramblin’ Rose,” “Solamente Una,” and my personal favorite, “Brazil.” You can find the playlists on Facebook (link above) as well as on YouTube.

12 Music Streams for Every Taste
OPERA/CLASSICAL

San Francisco Opera

The world-renowned San Francisco Opera company has announced a special series of streaming performances, including Arrigo Boito’s Mephistopheles, Bellini’s The Capulets and the Montagues, Jake Heggie and Gene Scheer’s Moby-Dick, and Donizetti’s Lucrezia Borgia. With each performance, you’ll basically have all weekend to watch and no registration is necessary! 

 

Metropolitan Opera’s Nightly Streams

New York’s Metropolitan Opera company is serving up almost as much opera as you can consume, streaming a different performance every night! These programs appear to be streamed in as high quality a format as possible (probably varying dependent upon age of the source material) via The Met’s website. Included are gems like Donizetti’s Lucia di Lammermoor, Borodin’s Prince Igor, and Verdi’s Luisa Miller, as well as more contemporary, such as Nico Muhly’s Marnie. I watched some of the Prince Igor stream, and it looked and sounded quite wonderful! Seeing Joan Sutherland again performing her signature role of Lucia brought tears to my eyes. 

 

San Francisco Symphony: Music Connects

While I have not yet heard about any livestreaming full concert performances, the members of the San Francisco Symphony have not been idle during COVD-19 isolation. Via the SF Symphony’s website, I have found numerous solo and group performances that have been shared by the performers as a Music Connects stream. It’s also up on YouTube directly so you can just start the playlist of 23 performances—some are snippets but most are full performance pieces of individual compositions that will cycle through for your enjoyment in 1080p resolution. Look for the adorable moment where the xylophone player gets reprimanded by his young son for playing Bach!

 

 

Clearly, this is a moment where livestreaming is finding a powerful new purpose. I can see this continuing and growing long after the current crisis is over, especially for artists who can’t tour for health or budgetary reasons, especially as they learn how to deliver superior production values and a compelling entertainment experience. Livestreaming is a great opportunity for the arts community!

Mark Smotroff

Mark Smotroff breathes music 24/7. His collection includes some 10,000 LPs, thousands of
CDs & downloads, and many hundreds of Blu-ray and DVD Audio discs. Professionally, Mark has
provided Marketing Communications services to the likes of DTS, Sony, Sega, Sharp, and AT&T.
He is also a musician, songwriter & producer, and has written about music professionally for
publications including Mix, Sound+Vision, and AudiophileReview. When does he sleep?

Top Gun (1986)

Top Gun (1986)

The United States Navy could scarcely have crafted a better or more effective recruiting film for promoting naval aviation than if they had actually written, produced, and directed Top Gun. (The Navy was involved in the production, providing access to jets and pilots, allowing filming on an active carrier, and suggesting some script rewrites.)

 

Tony Scott’s fast-paced film introduced viewers to a world most have never heard of—a school where the top 1% of fighter pilots went to hone their craft—and does everything possible to glamorize the fast-paced, life-on-the-edge, alpha-male lifestyle that is being the best-of-the-best: A member of the Navy’s elite carrier-based fighter squadron. Beyond its huge 

success at the box office—and launching a bomber-jacket craze across the country—the movie actually led to a huge recruiting increase for the Navy, to the point where recruiters actually set up stations at some theaters showing the film!

 

Beyond establishing his bona fides as a big-budget action director, Top Gun was Scott’s first collaboration with the dynamic production duo of Jerry Bruckheimer and Don Simpson. The film also features a host of young rising stars, including Tom Cruise in the lead role of something-to-prove renegade, Maverick; Val Kilmer as the mechanical, precise, and aloof Iceman; Anthony Edwards as Maverick’s RIO (Radio Intercept Officer, aka “back seater”) and wingman, Goose; and the too-cute Meg Griffin as Goose’s wife, Carole. (Also, keep an eye out for an incredibly young-looking Tim Robbins as Merlin on the carrier at the end when he removes his flight helmet.)

 

Released in 1986, Top Gun holds up remarkably well. (Except for the technology shown in the post-flight briefs, 

TOP GUN AT A GLANCE

The Tom Cruise mega-hit celebration of alpha-male fighter pilots gets a 4K HDR/Atmos upgrade that enhances its impact while staying faithful to its mid-’80s shot-on-film roots.

 

PICTURE     

Don’t expect the laser sharpness of contemporary digital photography, but do expect to see lots of detail, faithfully rendered colors, and punchy highlights.

 

SOUND

Atmos not only enhances the sense of being on the carrier deck and aboard the fighter planes but turns the climactic skirmish with the MiGs into a solid home theater demo.

which looks like a worn-out VHS tape badly in need of some head tracking!) Sure, some of the banter is cheesy, and there’s that random shirtless volleyball scene, but overall the film remains very entertaining, with enough of a plot and character development to keep you involved and caring about the characters until the next aerial dogfight. The numerous air-combat scenes feature actual planes opposed to the “let’s do it in CGI” world most effects films now live in. And the camera angles and pacing remain dynamic and exciting and offer a sense of what it is like to sit in the cockpit as you pull high-G maneuvers and go head-to-head against another jet with closing speeds exceeding 1,000 miles per hour. And the soundtrack is still every bit as catchy—and now better sounding!—as you remember.

 

Top Gun was filmed in Super 35 format (apparently because the anamorphic lenses were too large to fit inside the F-14 Tomcat’s cockpit) and comes to the home market with a new scan of the film taken from a true 4K digital intermediate. This release was likely designed to coincide with—and build excitement for—the upcoming sequel, Top Gun: Maverick, originally scheduled for theatrical release on June 24, now pushed to December 23.

 

As good as the film looks—which, without question, is the best it has ever looked—it isn’t realistic to expect it to have the same razor-sharp edges and micro detail of modern films shot digitally. The opening shots of the jets sitting on the carrier deck with the early morning light and smoke billowing around reveal a fair bit of grain and noise—as do some of the flying scenes taken in low-lighting conditions—but this is rarely distracting, and stays true to the film’s look instead of taking too heavy a hand with the digital noise reduction.

Top Gun (1986)

Edges are sharp and defined throughout, and closeups reveal tons of detail. For example, every star is clearly visible on the shoulder flag patches worn on uniforms, and you see the scratches, scuffs, and even seams in the detail tape used to decorate the pilots’ flight helmets. Tight shots on actors faces reveal every pore and whisker (including one distracting whisker Viper [Tom Skerrit] obviously missed while shaving near the end), along with Cruise’s unibrow, which has various stages throughout.

 

Something both my wife and I commented on was just how sweaty the actors are. Like, a lot. Faces are almost always covered, nay drenched in beads of sweat, even when there is apparently no reason for it. I mean, I’ve no doubt the US Navy Fighter Weapons School is an intense program, but actors frequently look like they have just finished a lengthy Bikram Yoga class. But these are the kinds of details the 4K transfer makes you aware of.

 

Colors are natural and lifelike throughout, with that orange-pink-purple color of West Coast evening sunsets looking very accurate and free of noise and banding—something difficult for a streaming service to do on a highly compressed delivery. The HDR gives some nice punch to the gleaming white T-shits, adds some nice brightness boosts to the Tomcat engines on full afterburners, and provides images with more overall depth and dimension.

 

The audio mix has been given a full Dolby TrueHD Atmos makeover, and while not as dynamic as a modern mix, it does a fantastic job of breathing new sonic life into this near-35-year-old film. Right from the start, Harold Faltermeyer’s “Top Gun 

Anthem” is given more space and room, then come the sounds of the mechanical noises aboard the carrier deck—the whipping winds, the ratcheting of gears and retracting chains, the roar as jet engines spool up for launch, and the steam from the catapult launch.

 

Once in the air, you can appreciate the increased dynamics of the high-powered jet engines, with jets streaking and roaring past overhead or ripping back along the side walls. Beyond the throaty roar of the engines, the missile impacts and explosions have a ton of bass output that will energize your room. The final scene, as Maverick and Ice hold off the Russian MiGs, sounds fantastic, and will likely become part of your home theater demo reel.

 

The soundtrack also does a nice job of delivering subtle (and not so subtle) atmospheric effects. For example, there is a completely different sonic quality when the camera is inside the cockpit, with the sounds of wind outside and breathing through the oxygen mask, compared to outside the jet. And when in the classroom, you’ll hear a variety of appropriate background sounds in the distance, including a variety of planes and helicopters, as well as a jet periodically ripping past overhead.

Top Gun

Top Gun is a classic for a reason, and it remains as much fun to watch now as the first time I saw it at a matinee back in the summer of 1986. Paramount did a wonderful job restoring the film, and this new 4K HDR version with Dolby Atmos audio is guaranteed to make your home theater feel the need . . . the need for speed!

 

(I was fortunate enough to do an overnight stay aboard a US aircraft carrier on deployment, and got to stand on the “foul line” and watch them launch and recover F-18s—a sound that feels like it is going to shred your ears and shake your body to bits! Click here to read more about my real-life adventure.)

John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

6 Classic Time Travel Films

6 Classic Time Travel Films

Humans are fascinated by the idea of traveling in time, either to observe what happened in the past or to learn about future civilizations. Ever since H.G. Wells published The Time Machine in 1895, the concept has captivated both creative artists and audiences. It’s no surprise that vaulting across the decades or centuries is a recurring theme in movies. What is less expected is the different approaches filmmakers have taken, both in terms of how the time travel is achieved and what motivates the experiment. Among the following six movies, no two have the same purpose.

6 Classic Time Travel Films

THE TIME MACHINE (1960)

This is the granddaddy of all time-travel films, the first theatrical release to use Wells’ book as source material. It’s directed and produced by George Pal. Screenwriter David Duncan stayed true to the novelist’s two lofty reasons to explore time: Knowledge for its own sake and the wish to believe human society will improve in the future. The dashing Rod Taylor plays Wells, and Alan Young is his best friend, Filby, showing up later as his own son. Yvette Mimieux is Weena, a cringe-worthily vapid blonde many thousands of years in the future, when pretty, empty-brained Aryan types live a perfect existence, except for the pesky fact that they’re controlled by a horrible humanoid species called the Morlocks.

 

Pal’s Time Machine is rightfully cherished for its Oscar-winning special effects, mostly achieved with stop-motion animation. Some scenes are reminiscent of Ray Harryhausen’s horror and humor—keep an eye out for an atomic lava flow that buries a London neighborhood!—while some are charming or beautiful. As Wells tentatively tries out his machine for the first time, we see what he sees: Flowers blooming and dying within seconds, a candle 

melting in a heartbeat, the seasons passing before our eyes. It seems the representation of time as a tunnel is not yet in the film lexicon, so this made sense as the best way to show time passing at different speeds. The visuals are enhanced by the rich Metrocolor hues.     A / G / I / KV / Y 

 

 

THE TIME MACHINE (2002)

Knowledge for its own sake doesn’t really fly as entertainment in the 21st century. So, for this Simon Wells-directed remake starring Guy Pearce, a new impetus was needed. If you’re familiar with the Penny Dreadful Showtime series, you’ll know that writer John Logan is devoted to love and destiny as underlying themes.

 

At the start of this screenplay, Logan has Pearce’s Alex (no longer named Wells) witness the death of his fiancée, prompting him to devise a way to go back and try to save her. It doesn’t work, so he decides to explore the future instead, eventually 

losing control and ending up beyond the next Ice Age. The Morlocks still hold power in this version, but now the terrified surviving humans finally have some agency and pride (not to mention melanin in their skin). Samantha Mumba is intelligent and sympathetic as Mara, the far-future woman who befriends the temporally and emotionally lost Alex.
AC G / I  / V / Y

 

 

TIME AFTER TIME (1979)

And speaking of self-actualized female characters, writer/ director Nicholas Meyer made a point of baffling Wells (Malcolm McDowell) with the “women’s lib” movement when the inventor shows up in 1979 San Francisco. No Morlocks are needed in this story. Wells is on the trail of another

How to Do Some Time Travel

All six of the films here are readily available on non-subscription streaming services. If you’re looking for the best possible picture and sound, Kaleidescape has everything but the 2002 Time Machine remake (which is free on Crackle).

 

A = Amazon Prime / C = Crackle
G = Google Play / I = iTunes
K = Kaleidescape / V = Vudu
Y = YouTube

kind of monster, Jack the Ripper, who turns out to be a friend in 1893 London (David Warner), fast-thinking enough to borrow the time machine to escape police. In 1979, Wells enlists the help of a bank official (Mary Steenburgen) to find the serial killer.

 

The cutting-edge visual effects are by Richard F. Taylor, who would later design Tron, and you’ll notice early versions of some ideas that show up in that later movie. While Meyer doesn’t really follow through with the feminism angle—this was 1979 Hollywood, after all—his primary motivation is to show that, while there are horrible people in every age, kindness is also a constant.     A / G / I / KV / Y 

 

 

PROJECT ALMANAC (2015)

The previous films make overarching claims about the human species, yet they skate over the challenge of getting a time machine to work. Focus on that process makes director Dan Israelite’s Project Almanac one of the most satisfying in terms

6 Classic Time Travel Films

of hard science fiction. This is even more surprising given that it’s a YA story about nerdy teens. The choice to shoot the whole thing as if through the characters’ phone cameras is distracting at first, but eventually pays off.

 

Instead of letting teen energy derail the story, writers Jason Pagan and Andrew Deutschman capitalize on common traits of the adolescent psyche. No deep philosophy here. 

David (Jonny Weston) wants to complete the time machine he finds in his late father’s lab so he and his brainy friends can have fun. He misuses it because he has a crush on a girl (Sofia Black-D’Elia). And rather than dreaming of traveling a thousand years to find Utopia, these kids want to go back to yesterday to do better on a test at school. No villain is needed; teens are their own worst enemy.      A / G / I / KV / Y 

 

 

THE FOUNTAIN (2006)

If there’s a villain in Darren Aronofsky’s The Fountain, it’s cancer. Tommy, played by Hugh Jackman, becomes obsessed with cheating death when his wife Izzy (Rachael Weisz) develops an inoperable brain tumor. Maybe this isn’t a time-travel movie at all; there’s no time machine. But whether it’s Tommy’s conviction to live until the end of the universe to find a cure, or Izzy’s tumor-induced vision of herself as a queen in Renaissance Spain with Tommy as her conquistador seeking the Fountain of Youth, the characters certainly experience many aspects of time.

 

This film is also astonishingly beautiful. The meditative score by Clint Mansell supports James Chinlund and Isabelle Guay’s breathtaking designs inspired by Mayan art and ancient Indian mandalas. Don’t expect a linear story; just let the temporal shards wash over you, and the pieces will come together.     A / G / I / KV / Y 

6 Classic Time Travel Films

12 MONKEYS (1995)

In the era of COVID-19, movies about pandemics are more popular than ever. Terry Gilliam’s 12 Monkeys doesn’t show one moment of the disease itself, but instead jumps between its aftermath a generation later, when surviving humans must live underground, and the years leading up to the 1996 outbreak. Written by David and Janet Peoples, the screenplay is an expansion of Chris Marker’s 1962 short, La Jetée.

 

James Cole (Bruce Willis) is sent from the future to trace the origins of a virus that kills five billion people. He shows up too early, landing him in a mental institution, where he’s treated by Dr. Railly (Madeleine Stowe) and encouraged to escape by the manic Jeffrey Goins (Brad Pitt, in a career-altering role), who happens to be the son of a famous virologist (Christopher Plummer). The top-notch plot twist tells us that studying history is just a long game of Telephone; even the best scholars’ conclusions about the past may be hilariously and tragically wrong. No one can show the slime and grunge of disintegrating society quite like Gilliam, who makes a point of conflating the post-viral dystopia with the nightmare always lived by the world’s homeless and unwanted.     A / G / KV / Y

Anne E. Johnson

Anne E. Johnson is a freelance writer in Brooklyn. Her music journalism appears
regularly in
Copper Magazine, Classical Voice North America, and Stereophile. She’s
also the author of several novels and over 100 short stories, mostly science fiction
and fantasy. Learn more on AnneEJohnson.com.

Once in a Lifetime Sessions with Nile Rodgers

Once in a Lifetime Sessions with Nile Rodgers

Like so many of us, when using Netflix or some other streaming service I tend to browse to find something to watch rather than zeroing in on a particular show. Since my tastes run to music, I usually seek out music-related documentaries and concert films. So I somewhat semi-randomly stumbled upon this episode of a Netflix series called Once in a Lifetime Sessions, a documentary series featuring musicians talking about their careers and performing live in concert and in the 

recording studio—including a live-to-vinyl session! If you’re looking for a “history of the band”-type documentary, this isn’t it—but it is an insightful look into Nile Rodgers’ career, life, and flat-out incredible musical chops.

 

Rodgers is the co-founder of Chic (along with bassist extraordinaire Bernard Edwards), a band that burst upon the disco and pop music scene in 1972 with hits like “Le Freak,” “I Want Your Love,” and their signature, oft-sampled mega-smash “Good Times.” Rodgers is also an extremely successful producer—a small sample of songs he’s been behind the board for include David Bowie’s “Let’s Dance,” “We Are Family” by Sister Sledge, “Upside Down” and “I’m Coming Out” by Diana Ross, and a little thing you might have heard recently—Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky.”

 

He is also known as one of the best rhythm guitarists of all time, with a distinctive funky propulsive style that, while 

NILE RODGERS AT A GLANCE

The Chic co-founder, hitmaker, and legendary rhythm guitarist dissects his most famous tracks, talks about his life, and stages a super-tight club performance with his bandmates. 

 

PICTURE     

Attractive and direct documentary-style visuals mercifully free of gimmicks.

 

SOUND

Clean, rich sound, with plenty of bass and with each instrument clearly heard—but in a mix so lacking in stereo spread it borders on mono.

deceptively simple-sounding, no one else can quite duplicate. Think of that opening riff to “Good Times.” You’re probably hearing that unstoppable guitar groove in your head right now, along with Edwards’ iconic bass line, maybe the greatest electric bass riff ever.

 

Naturally I wanted to know—how did he do it? The documentary answers that question and a whole lot more, featuring plenty of interview footage at Angel Studios, London, where Rodgers tells exactly how he did it. An engineer pulls up individual tracks from the master tapes so you can hear each musician’s parts while Rodgers explains the creative process of how and why the players came up with them. For a musician like me, fascinating, and even if you can’t play a note you’ll learn a lot about the process.

 

Rodgers goes into rich detail about how he and others wrote the songs. Just one of many quotes: “As musicians, we want our voices to be heard, right? That means we want hit records . . . We knew that we had to come up with our own formula for making hits, and we knew that the chorus somehow was what people always wanted to get to . . . So we thought, well, what if we just started with the chorus? That way we give people the dessert first!”

 

He doesn’t just talk about the song-creation process, though. The interviewer draws plenty of life experience from Rodgers, whose parents were drug-dependent. As a result, the family moved a lot and he was the only black kid in a lot of the schools he wound up in. “I didn’t fit in and I was bullied a lot.” Rodgers is unblinkingly candid about his bouts with alcohol and drug

use and falling into the vortex of the 1970s and 1980s partying lifestyle. He thought he was young and invincible and could sustain that level of excess (it worked, for a while), but after it started to affect his playing, he just stopped cold and has been clean ever since.

 

But, for me, the highlight of Once in a Lifetime Sessions with Nile Rodgers

is the live performance footage. Rodgers and his musicians and singers are incredibly tight. I mean, unbelievably tight. I mean, ridiculously superhumanly astoundingly tight. Watching them is a master class in how to play together, how to lock in as musicians, how to groove. As a musician, I can tell you it’s tough to just play through a song without hitting a “clam” (wrong note), let alone play with any kind of feel and swing and togetherness.

 

In this respect, watching Chic play together is in the true sense awe-inspiring and more than a little humbling. In both the concert footage (actually a club somewhere in the UK) and the in-studio performances, these guys and gals are killing it. Nailing it. Destroying it! Every musician is remarkable, and singer Kim Davis-Jones is hair-raisingly good, just an absolute complete knockout. I don’t care if your thing is folk, rock, hip-hop, whatever—if you’re a musician, consider this required viewing.

 

The sound quality is extremely good—clean, rich, and with plenty of that all-important bass and kick drum, and every instrument can be clearly heard. Yet the sound is somewhat mono-ish, lacking in stereo spread. Although I’m usually a sonic purist, I tried various modes on my old but great-sounding Harman Kardon A/V receiver and found the music most enjoyable while listening in surround, particularly Harman Kardon’s Logic 7 Music mode.

 

The visuals are fine—pretty much straightforward. I mean, how much “production” can you do with interview filming that wouldn’t ultimately be distracting? And the concert footage is refreshingly direct, alternating between shots of the band and the individual players with a lack of distraction and gratuitous effects. (We’ve all seen way too much of that sort of thing.)

 

Rodgers concludes the documentary by talking about his “insane” work ethic, something he’s never let go of. For him, hard work and life are one and the same. The 67-year-old Rodgers states, “I always say that I have 10 good years left. I’ve been saying that since I was 20!” Amen, brother.

Frank Doris

Frank Doris is the chief cook & bottle washer for Frank Doris/Public Relations and works with a
number of audio & music industry clients. He’s a professional guitarist and a vinyl enthusiast with
multiple turntables and thousands of records.

“The Hunger Games” and “Catching Fire”

The Hunger Games

Never mind that they’re categorized as YA (Young Adult) fiction, Suzanne Collins’ Hunger Games trilogy—The Hunger Games, Catching Fire, and Mockingjay—was a must-read between 2008 and 2010. Now, nearly 10 years after the last book in the trilogy, Collins is bringing readers back to Panem with a prequel novel titled The Ballad of Songbirds and Snakes, which takes place about 50 years before heroine Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) is born and will follow Coriolanus Snow (Donald Sutherland) long before he rises to power as President.

Several weeks ago, Dennis Burger wrote about his and his wife’s annual tradition of watching The Lord of the Rings trilogy, returning to the films much like comfort food. The Hunger Games has a similar quality for me and my wife. When browsing through the onscreen cover-art display on our Kaleidescape system, one of the four titles in the tetralogy is bound to pop up, prompting us to say, “Oh! The Hunger Games. I’d totally be up for watching that again!”

 

I can’t say just what it is I love so much about these movies. Perhaps it’s because the films—particularly The Hunger Games—do such a wonderful job of staying true to the fantastic source material. Perhaps it’s because even though the first film revolves around an almost entirely teenage cast, it never treats it as a kid’s story. Perhaps it’s because with all the films clocking in at over two hours—with the first two just shy of two and a half—it’s because they have plenty of time to develop, giving you an opportunity to actually care about these characters and their life-and-death struggle. Perhaps it’s the fantastic acting, including the role

GAMES AND FIRE AT A GLANCE

With a Hunger Games prequel novel about to hit stores, now is an ideal time to revisit the film adaptations of the original book series. The first two movies—The Hunger Games and Catching Firehaving been shot on film, especially benefit from the 4K/HDR treatment.

 

PICTURE     

HDR adds depth and dimension to the shots, and punch to brighter elements like flames, fireballs, and Caesar’s smile.

 

SOUND

The Atmos mixes feature tons of immersive atmospheric effects, hard-directional cues, and generous use of the height channels.

that turned Lawrence into a superstar and Woody Harrelson’s perfect take on former Games winner now mentor Haymitch Abernathy.

 

For those not familiar with the story, I’d urge you to first visit the novels, as they do help to flesh out some bits that will increase your appreciation for the series. If reading isn’t in your future, then I’ll offer a spoiler-free summary.

 

In a dystopian future, the nation of Panem is divided into 12 districts. Rebellion nearly tore the nation apart, and as the opening titles inform, “In penance for their uprising, each district shall offer up a male and female between the ages of 12 and 18 at a public ‘Reaping.’ These Tributes shall be delivered to the custody of The Capital. And then transferred to a public arena where they will Fight to the Death, until a lone victor remains.”

 

Hailing from District 12—one of the poorest in Panem—Katniss volunteers as Tribute after her younger sister’s name is initially selected for participation in the 74th annual Hunger Games. Katniss and fellow District 12 Tribute Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson) are then whisked away to the Capital, where they are given makeovers along with time to train and to hone their skills, both in order to survive the Games and to hopefully impress viewers in an effort to curry favor with wealthy sponsors who can potentially save a Tribute’s life by sending gifts into the Games.

 

If you like to draw parallels between films and our country’s current political situation, there are elements here between the charged climate in Panem and our national divide, should you want to look for them. Panem is pretty clearly divided between the haves of Districts 1 and 2 and the have-nots of everyone else, which can be a nod to the 1%-ers. There are also those who support and love the Capital and those who want to start a rebellion against it. The tenuous role of Gamekeeper—kept alive and in position at the whim of President Snow—could also be compared to the current administration’s revolving Chief of Staff position.

The Hunger Games

Of the four films—the final installment of the book trilogy, Mockingjay, being split into two parts—The Hunger Games is my favorite. Getting to know Katniss, Peeta, Gale (Liam Hemsworth), Haymitch, Effie (Elizabeth Banks), and over-the-top host Caesar Flickerman (Stanley Tucci) establishes and draws you into the series.

 

Taking place almost a year 

after the events of The Hunger Games, the second film, Catching Fire, uses the Quarter Quell to turn victors’ lives upside down—“What we game makers like to call ‘a wrinkle.’” It also tells you far more about life in the Capital and sets the spark of the rebellion that occurs in the final two films, both of which take place almost immediately after the second film ends.

 

With 24 teens fighting in The Hunger Games until a “lone victor remains,” you’d expect a lot of death, and the filmmakers handle this in a PG-13 manner without shying away from it or glorifying it. By far, the most action happens at the Cornucopia at the very start of the games, but this is filmed in a frantic, handheld style with quick cutaways and edits that give you the sense of what is happening—and who is dying—while sparing you the gore.

 

All four films are available in both UHD Blu-ray and via Kaleidescape in full 4K HDR. The first two were filmed in 35mm and were taken from a 2K digital intermediate for home release, while the final two were shot on ArriRaw at 2.8K and taken from a true 4K DI.

 

The filmmakers frequently push in tight on actors, often with a face almost filling the screen, and you can appreciate the terrific detail here. Every pore, scar, and stray hair—even Effie’s pancake makeup—is clearly on display. You can also see all the texture and detail in clothing, with the jackets worn by Katniss and Rue (Amandla Stenberg) having fine single-line detail on the shoulders that is sharp and clear. The only artifacting I noticed was some jaggies in the shadows of fallen spears at the 42 minute mark in the first movie.

 

Longer shots in The Hunger Games are softer, however, with the leaves and trees in the forest not having razor-sharp edges. Also, there is a large tree in Catching Fire that is pretty obviously CGI that looks soft in the 4K transfer.

 

Night plays a key role in the first two films—it’s the best time to move around undetected when you’re being hunted or to hunker down and sleep—and while blacks were deep with nice low-level detail, there is a bit of noise in parts of the first film I didn’t notice in the second. Also, there’s a tad of grain in some of the shots in the first film, but it’s not distracting.

 

HDR’s enhanced contrast adds depth and dimension to the images, and gives additional punch to things like roaring flames, fireballs, or even Caesar’s enhanced smile. It also creates a wonderfully natural image in the second film when some characters are talking next to a fire with their faces lit with a warm glow from the flames. You can appreciate the wider color gamut and HDR in Catching Fire, where you see the elaborate costumes at the Capital party, the glowing lights on Caesar’s 

set, or Katniss’ “girl on fire” dress with colors that burn off the screen.

 

All four films feature Dolby TrueHD Atmos soundtracks, and while the mixes for the first two aren’t overly aggressive, they certainly do a great job of putting you in the action, with tons of immersive atmospheric sounds, hard-directional cues, and generous use of the height speakers when appropriate.

 

During the many outdoor scenes, the room fills with the sounds of insects buzzing, leaves rustling, and birds chirping. The room also fills with the sounds of Caesar’s roaring crowds, or the buzz and hum of machinery and lighting inside the Game room. There are also a couple of moments where 

The Hunger Games
Catching Fire

you’re alerted to someone behind you by the snap of a twig from the rear or the angry bzzzzz of a tracker-jacker nest. PA announcements are mixed into the height speakers to good effect, making it sound like the voice is booming into the arena.

 

The couple of moments in Catching Fire that feature gunfire are loud, sharp, and dynamic, and when there is a moment that calls for deep bass—fireballs crashing into trees, trees crackling and splintering, the cannon boom announcing the death of a Tribute—the soundtrack delivers.

 

Dialogue remains well presented and clear no matter the action, making sure you never miss an important exchange between characters.

 

The Hunger Games series has great replay value. It’s entertaining from start to finish, whether you’re watching it for the first time or the tenth. (Seeing the first two movies for the first time even inspired my 13-year-old daughter to go read the books.) If you haven’t watched it presented in full 4K HDR with the Atmos soundtrack, now is the perfect time to get ready for your return to Panem when Collins’ new book arrives on May 19.

John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

The Invisible Man (2020)

The Invisible Man (2020)

As I begin this review, I’m chuckling to myself over something I wrote in my Underwater review almost a month ago: “Somewhere along the line (perhaps in 2004 with the introduction of the first film in the Saw franchise), Hollywood started turning the horror genre into something . . . distasteful. Filmmakers went from trying to simply scare people to trying to outdo each other by shocking and brutalizing viewers with horribly graphic depictions of torture and mutilation.”

 

The Invisible Man is categorized as “horror” and happens to be written and directed by Leigh Whannell, the gentleman who wrote the first three films in the Saw franchise as well as four installments of the grisly Insidious series. But don’t let 

Whannell’s connection with those films deter you from seeing Man, as it is far more a psychological thriller with a few jump scares thrown in than a traditional horror film, and it certainly shares little of the grisly attention to the macabre with Saw.

 

Following a string of films over the years based loosely on H. G. Wells’ 1897 book of the same name, Man updates the story for the 21st century, using modern technology along with some timely feminist issues to craft a tale that is both suspenseful and engaging. It was also one of the films that received an incredibly short theatrical run—just four weeks—before NBC Universal made the decision to make it available as a premium-video-on-demand rental for $19.99 and then for purchase in full 4K HDR video quality with a Dolby TrueHD Atmos soundtrack.

 

The film begins with Cecilia Kass (Elisabeth Moss) escaping a beautiful oceanfront home in the dead of night. We’re given no reason for her escape, but her terrified demeanor and elaborate plans, which include drugging her husband

INVISIBLE AT A GLANCE

More psychological thriller than horror film, The Invisible Man relies on film-like visuals and a carefully crafted surround mix to create an appropriately creepy atmosphere and deliver the scares.

 

PICTURE     

HDR helps bring needed accents of light to the film’s many dark scenes.

 

SOUND

The Atmos mix heightens the sense of horror by continually immersing you in the action, whether through subtle sounds like the creaking of tree limbs or the loud crashing of waves against a rocky shore.

with Diazepam and turning off all the security cameras, make it clear the marriage to wealthy optics pioneer Adrian Griffin (Oliver Jackson-Cohen) has not been a loving one.

 

Cecilia describes years of dominating control and psychological and physical abuse at the hands of Adrian, and hides out with policer-officer friend James Lanier (Aldis Hodge) and his teenage daughter Sydney (Storm Reid), terrified to even step foot outside the house for fear her husband will track her down. When her sister Emily (Harriet Dyer) brings news that Adrian was found dead of apparent suicide, Cecilia feels her life might finally be hers again. But she is then summoned to the law office of her husband’s brother, Tom (Michael Dorman), who informs her that Adrian left her $5 million.

 

Which is when the weirdness starts happening.

 

Cecilia can’t shake the feeling she is being watched or there is another presence in the room with her. Blankets get pulled off her in the middle of the night, doors open and lights flicker, then the bottle of Diazepam she used to drug Adrian appears on her bathroom counter.

 

Of course, when Cecilia suggests that her husband faked his own death, found a way to make himself invisible, and is harassing her, no one believes her, thinking this is just PTSD from the years of abuse. Even when she tells them, “He said that wherever I went, he would find me, walk right up to me, and I wouldn’t be able to see him,” the thought of an invisible person tormenting her is too much for people to believe.

 

When this specter starts actively ruining Cecilia’s life—sabotaging a job interview, sending hateful emails, hitting Sydney, and more  . .and worse—Cecilia decides she has to get proactive.

 

Filmed on the paltry budget of just $7 million, Man is not an effects-laden film, but is propelled by Moss’s terrific acting and some interesting camerawork. Often, the lens will slowly travel to an unoccupied part of a room and just . . . linger there. “Is something there?” “Are we supposed to be seeing something?” “Is something going to happen?” This adds to the tension of many scenes, as you are left hanging with this will it?/won’t it? stress that keeps you engaged.

 

With many “horror” films, you are shown the subject of the nightmare fairly early. Take Pennywise the Clown from It. From the very beginning, we know what he looks like (at least in his preferred form), and seeing him/It takes away some of that fear because it is now a known. Once we see the boogie man, we can process it and deal with it. But when you don’t, or in this case can’t, see the thing that is haunting you, it becomes all the more terrifying. Is it there, right next to me? Is it waiting just in the other room? The sense that it can pop out literally at any moment from anywhere heightens the suspense and adds to the jump-scare factor.

 

One of the classic tropes of films involving invisible men is the classic shower scene—unseen man sneaks into the shower and creepily watches young girl(s) showering. I’m happy to say that Whannell avoids that, and the film is certainly better for not stooping to that level.

 

Shot on Arriraw at 4.5 K resolution, Man is sourced from a true 4K digital intermediate. While images are clean and detailed throughout, I found them to be of the “softer” variety, looking more film-like rather than digital. Long shots didn’t have that razor-sharp quality of some transfers. Closeups certainly retain a ton of detail, with the tight shots on Moss revealing every ounce of emotion and every subtle inflection in her gaze, along with every pore, line, hair, and blotch. We can also appreciate fine fabric detail, such as the weave texture on Cecilia’s pillowcase.

 

The color palette is often on the dreary side with exterior shots, with even an early shot of the Golden Gate Bridge appearing in a blue-grey misty morning pan. Interiors often have a slick-modern silvery blue-grey look as well.

 

There are many dark scenes in the film, and HDR is used nicely to give extra pop to bright lighting throughout, whether the lights in the darkened house Cecilia escapes at the beginning, the gleaming overhead fluorescents of Adrian’s work space, or piercing flashlight beams. Beyond just the added brightness, images look incredibly natural with lots of depth and black-level

detail.

 

When watching It, I discovered just how much a creative audio mix can heighten a horror movie, adding to the tension and awareness of what is happening by having subtle little audio cues emanate from a full 360-degree soundfield. The Dolby Atmos soundtrack here does a great job of immersing you in the onscreen action. From the opening moments, where massive waves roll in overhead to powerfully crash on rocks against the front wall, you are in the action, and audio is used in sudden jarringly loud and dynamic moments to keep you on edge.

 

As you move about throughout quiet scenes, there are the subtle sounds of wind howling outside, the buzz of fluorescent lights, the sounds of air blowing through a gently rattling HVAC register, or the creaking and swaying of tree limbs and branches. Inside, you hear audio cues of doors creaking open, footsteps treading on wooden floors, or the buzz of a silenced cellphone over your head. There is also a pouring rainstorm that pelts water into your room, with the sound of heavy droplets splashing overhead.

 

The musical score by Benjamin Wallfisch Chamber is also appropriately tense. It features Christopher Egan conducting the Orchestra of London, and there are

The Invisible Man (2020)

several moments, such as the opening “Escape” or the song “Attack,” that have an ominous, almost alien-sounding quality as they blare loud electronic bass-heavy notes from all around.

 

When I can’t take my eyes off the screen long enough to jot down a viewing note, I know the film is intense and engaging. The Invisible Man might be treading through mostly familiar territory, but it does it with first-rate acting and a quality audio mix. And there aren’t too many horror films that can garner Rotten Tomatoes critics’ ratings of 91 and Audience Scores of 88. If you’re looking for a movie that offers a bit of edge along with a couple of good scares, The Invisible Man makes for a fun night in your home theater.

John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

3 Must-See Music-Based Videos

3 Must-See Music-Based Videos

Across the Universe

There is no shortage of things to watch these days, but sometimes it’s hard to figure out where the good stuff is hiding—especially when it comes to music-related programming. There are often things that look cool but fall flat in other areas, particularly with the actual performances. Some programs sound great but have lesser production values that become obvious when viewed on a quality home theater or media room system. 

 

Here are three music-centric presentations that offer dynamic visuals, impressive—even game-changing—performances, and compelling, often immersive, surround sound experiences. (All three are available on Blu-ray and for download from Kaleidescape. Across the Universe is also widely available for streaming.)

 

 

Pat Metheny: The Orchestrion Project—Stunning Visuals, Magical Music

Whether you like Pat Metheny’s music or not, watching this live-in-the-studio end-of-tour video featuring his Orchestrion project, is a mesmerizing demo-worthy view. Not sure what an Orchestrion is? Well, perhaps an excerpt from my earlier review of this performance on Blu-ray will help paint a picture:

 

Have you ever been to one of those “Pizza ‘n Pipes” type restaurants? You know, one of those places where they rip apart an old-time movie theater pipe organ and then set it up in a pizza parlor, placing all the inner workings and 

accompaniment instruments (like percussion ‘n bells ‘n stuff) all around the restaurant for all to see and watch while the organist plays. It is really quite entertaining and mesmerizing if you can find one that is still open.

 

So that is effectively what we have here in a 21st 

Century manner—a computer-propelled, guitar-user-controlled orchestra all performing compositions Metheny wrote specifically for this project. The results are spectacular! 

 

I have this performance on Blu-ray and it looks terrific in 1080p, with remarkably crisp definition on all the multitude of instruments in the dynamically lit loft studio space. The lossless Dolby TrueHD surround mix (up to 7.1 channels) delivers a very immersive experience, but even in stereo the sound is rich, engaging, and almost three-dimensional.    Kaleidescape

 

 

Across the Universe—Demo-Worthy Beatles Bliss

Beatles fans tend to be divided about this film, but I have much love for it. It is one of the rare instances where Beatles music has been reinterpreted well, in a compelling new way while still respecting the underlying song.

 

All in all, Across the Universe has a great deal of entertainment depth to it. It can be viewed on its own, with a strong storyline and extremely high production values. As a musical, it works very well too, bringing new meaning/interpretation to the Beatles’ music in the context of the storyline. And if you are a Beatles fan and of ‘60s counterculture, with its iconic stars like Janis Joplin, Tina Turner, and Jimi Hendrix, you’ll no doubt catch the references. There are all sorts of neat little Easter egg-type moments peppered throughout. (For example, all the characters are named after people mentioned in actual Beatles songs.)

 

I love how Joe Cocker plays three completely different characters during the “Come Together” scene (a bum, a hippie, and a pimp!). Be on the lookout for a re-creation/representation of Janis’s psychedelic painted Porsche on the streets of New York in

one scene. There are many references like this throughout the film.

 

Across the Universe is a rich viewing experience with an immersive soundtrack that starts out subtly and builds in intensity as the plot-line thickens. For example, listen how the room ambience changes in the opening scenes during the relatively simple early

Beatles rocker “Hold Me Tight,” which shifts perspective between parallel lives of key characters who have yet to meet. One is shot in a bright wood-floored American dance-hall auditorium while the other is in a murky, claustrophobic stone basement club in England. I’m pretty sure that latter scene was shot in the current version of Liverpool’s Cavern Club (a nightspot where the Beatles initially built up their following). It’s all the more impressive how the music stays in sync between what sounds like two different bands performing (although I suspect it is probably just the different mixes that create that aural illusion).

 

By the end of the film, scenes such as “Strawberry Fields Forever” and “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” have sometimes intensely immersive surround mixes supporting the spectacular psychedelic-dramatic visuals. These could become demo-worthy audio-visual experiences for some of you!

 

I’ll leave you with some advice pulled from one of John Lennon’s early solo singles: “Play Loud”!  This movie sounds great when you pump up the volume, so don’t hold back. If you want to read more about Across the Universe, click here and here to get to one of my earlier reviews related to it.    Amazon / Google / iTunes / Kaleidescape / Vudu / YouTube

 

 

Jimi Hendrix: Live At Woodstock—Legendary Rock History

In the annals of rock and roll, there are a handful of seminal concert performances everyone needs to experience at some point. Near the top of that list are the ones by Jimi Hendrix. 

 

This recently updated version of his appearance at the Woodstock festival in 1969 is particularly important because new footage materialized that fleshes out the performance, in which portions were missing. (Camera people ran out of film stock and were switching reels.) At some points, you can see angles the official cameras missed, especially closeups on Hendrix’

guitar playing. The new footage was shot unofficially by a 22-year old student from Bard College who brazenly walked up on stage with primitive video gear he had access to. He timed his ascent to the stage carefully so he would be seen as part of Hendrix’ and the filmmaking entourage, allowing him to openly set up his gear and record the performance! 

 

In this footage, segments of the performance missed 

3 Must-See Music-Based Videos

by the actual film crew were captured and 30 years later were shared with the Hendrix Estate for the sake of historical preservation. So while there are inevitable technical imperfections visually—this new footage is low-res, early black & white video—to be able to effectively see the full performance for the first time is a wonderful thing indeed! All things considered, it looks remarkable, benefitting greatly from the delayed beginning of Hendrix’ set during the daytime on the final day of the festival. If he had gone on at night, the footage would not be so compelling.

 

Original engineer/producer Eddie Kramer mixed the whole concert into 5.1 surround sound so now you can enjoy a quite fabulous immersion into the feel of what it might have been like standing near the stage during Hendrix’s legendary performance. It’s not exactly “demo worthy,” but musically and historically, Hendrix at Woodstock is essential viewing and listening.

 

After this, go back and watch Hendrix’ performances at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967—his game-changing career breakthrough in the U.S.—and at the Berkeley Community Center (recordings that ended up on the great posthumous album Hendrix in the West).    Kaleidescape

Mark Smotroff

Mark Smotroff breathes music 24/7. His collection includes some 10,000 LPs, thousands of
CDs & downloads, and many hundreds of Blu-ray and DVD Audio discs. Professionally, Mark has
provided Marketing Communications services to the likes of DTS, Sony, Sega, Sharp, and AT&T.
He is also a musician, songwriter & producer, and has written about music professionally for
publications including Mix, Sound+Vision, and AudiophileReview. When does he sleep?

Musician Eliot Lewis on Doing Livestreams Right

Musician Eliot Lewis on Doing Livestreams Right

As a Hall & Oates and Live from Daryl’s House band member and a multi-instrumentalist who frequently takes his solo act on tour, Eliot Lewis suddenly found himself with nowhere to perform when the world came to a hard stop in March. Like many musicians, he soon embraced livestreaming as a virtual alternative. But, unlike many musicians, he decided to offer his fans a more satisfying experience by bringing his streams as close to the level of studio recording as possible—a laudable effort that deserved a closer look.

—Michael Gaughn

How many Facebook livestreams have you done over the past couple of months?

I’ve been doing them once a week on Wednesday. so it would probably be around eight so far. A lot of people are doing them almost every day—three or four a week. I wanted to make them a little more special than that. Quality over quantity.

 

What are you doing to mix it up a little?

The cool thing about doing a livestream, and one of the reasons so many of us musicians have turned to them, is that it gives us something to focus on. Like with any live show, I work up new arrangements for songs, I’ll take requests. I write my own music. Some weeks I’ll do full backing tracks where it can have all the instrumentation around me, and then other weeks I’ll break it down to an acoustic show.

 

Also, because I’m a multi-instrumentalist, I do something where I’m playing guitar and singing, and I’m also playing drums with my feet. It’s an electronic drum kit I’ve come up with and programmed so everything can be live and spontaneous. I can 

change from one thing to the other on the drop of a dime.

 

On one of your streams, someone asked about the drums and I thought you were joking when you responded that you were playing them with your feet.

There are a few blues guys who will play steel, string, and acoustic guitar, and also play these snare 

Musician Eliot Lewis on Doing Livestreams Right

drums or a kick drum, and it’s very, very basic. I expanded that idea into my musical universe and came up with a way of doing it with drum samples and trigger pads. They’re electronic trigger pads but with real heads on them and real kick pedals so it feels like I’m playing a real bass drum. I’ve programmed it where I can have a kick and a snare I can change per song. If I want to do a ballad, I can have a softer sound. I’ve programmed a crash cymbal where I’m hitting the kick drum at a higher velocity.

 

If I’m not mistaken, you perform most or all of the parts on your solo albums.

Yeah, everything is done by me. The only thing I’ll add is some extra background vocals from people.

 

So you’d already had a lot of practice before you jumped into streaming.

Well, yeah, since I was 10 years old. So that’s a few years.

 

Given how many people are relying on performance online now, it seems like it’s on a lot of musicians’ shoulders to move beyond iPhones in portrait mode. Have you seen other people trying to up the quality of their performances or 

trying to innovate a little with how they’re presenting?

When people started to focus on livestreams back in March, most of them were just using an iPhone, which there’s nothing wrong with that. But a lot of them were just using the built-in microphone and, depending on the internet connection or their data streaming, the sound could be really not good. And a lot were using the selfie side of the camera, which would flip the image and make a right-handed player look like they were playing lefty. And often the lighting wasn’t great.

 

So I just thought, “If I’m going to do this, I want to do it properly.” I literally started with my iPhone as well—iPhone 10, which has got a really decent camera on it. But instead of using the selfie one, I realized it would be much better to use the back-facing camera, which has higher resolution.

 

And I didn’t want to rely on the audio from the phone. I have a Yamaha mixer that’s iOS compatible, so I run everything directly and try to make it a really quality experience. I’m upgrading everything as we speak. I’ve got a GoPro Hero 8.

I also have a pretty good quality Panasonic Lumix DSLR camera with a nice Zeiss lens, which I’m incorporating for some of the stuff.

 

There’s a bit of a learning curve in going from a basic livestream to actually shooting video with proper studio lighting and that. But I had a little bit of an edge because I do a lot of photography to start with.

 

Acoustically, it looks like you’re miking pretty closely so the room isn’t having a lot of influence.

You’re absolutely right. I’m in an apartment, so I don’t have a ton of space. I’ve got full carpeting and I have some sound treatment I have up just for recording purposes, so it’s pretty dry. But I can control that with a little reverb or compression in my mixer as I’m doing it. It definitely is more studio-like than some of the stuff on livestreams where you hear a ton of the room, which can be distracting, obviously.

 

Were you doing professional recording in that space before all this happened?

Yeah. I’m such a self-sufficient musician—I write and record everything myself—so wherever I live, I end up setting up a home studio. I’ve been doing it all of my life since way back with multitrack cassette players. I don’t need a ton of room. I’m sort of a minimalist in that way. Everything I do in my apartment is record-studio quality, so that just transfers right over to the stuff I’ve been doing in the livestreams.

Was Live from Daryl’s House another form of preparation for all this?

Absolutely. I’ve been very, very fortunate because I’m the only musician, aside from Daryl, who’s been on every episode, all 90 of them. So that undoubtedly helped me with my own little livestreams and video performances, although the level is 

completely different. We started Live from Daryl’s House with a very small, very meager production and then it grew very quickly.

 

Are there any specific streams or videos you’ve seen lately you could point to as particularly good or interesting examples?

There are. Obviously, some of the artists have their pick of good production. I’ve seen stuff Keith Urban is doing, and Grace Potter, and, oh God, Allen Stone. Allen did Live from Daryl’s House and he was deep into video to begin with. So when he needed to do livestreaming, it was really properly done. I think he’s probably using OBS and multiple high-def cameras. So he’s really got it going on.

 

A good friend of mine, a great guitar player named Johnny A, is doing a morning livestream on Facebook five days a week. He’s not so much concerned with the video quality. But one of the positive things is that he’s getting a lot more people to interact with him. So sometimes it’s not all about the quality; it’s really about the content and how you present yourself and what you’re saying and who you get involved.

 

You have a new video out inspired by the current situation. Is there anything about its genesis you’d like to talk about?

I happened to be separated from somebody I love during the start of 

Musician Eliot Lewis on Doing Livestreams Right

this. The last physical show I did was at Madison Square Garden with Hall and Oates, and that was late February. I was out in the audience with her and friends and it was only two or three weeks later that New York just blew up. So long story short, she went back into the healthcare system so I haven’t seen her in a couple of months. That’s really where that song came about. I thought it’s something a lot of people can relate to because a lot of them have been separated from their children or from their parents in nursing homes.

Do you see all of this permanently changing how musicians are going to be thinking about performance?

I do. One of the positive aspects is that because these streams are live, musicians are going to become more conscious of upping their performance game. Since you can have tens of thousands of people getting onto your livestreams, you’ve got to make sure you’re prepared and your performance is right, because you can’t go back and fix stuff. That takes us back to more of the golden era of record-making and music-making where it was all performance. People didn’t have Pro Tools and digital workstations to cut and paste and fix and auto tune things.

 

And I think that when we do get back to a more normal situation where we can play live again, a lot of us are going to incorporate what we’ve been doing now. I know I will, because I really enjoy this part of it. It’s forced me to dive even further into livestreaming and video, and I’m learning a lot through the process.

Michael Gaughn—The Absolute Sound, The Perfect Vision, Wideband, Stereo Review,
Sound & Vision, The Rayva Roundtablemarketing, product design, some theater designs,
couple TV shows, some commercials, and now this.

Who’s Doing Livestreams Right?

Ben Folds takes requests—and gives piano lessons to kids—while stuck in Australia.

The audience for livestreams has exploded in recent weeks as people have exhausted their options for more traditional mainstream entertainment and musicians and other performers have embraced online performance as the best near-term solution for engaging their fans. I talked to acoustic designer Steve Haas about who’s doing a good job of broadcasting from the internet and what musicians can do to up the sonic quality of their streams.

—Michael Gaughn

Thanks to the boom in livestreams, a lot of people are being exposed for the first time to the idea of famous musicians doing intimate performances, but you’ve been aware of and helping to arrange home performances for a while now, right?

Yes. I’ve been very passionate about promoting house concerts, and have been creating private concert venues in people’s homes for a long time. Before the pandemic, hosts of house concerts were putting on monthly shows with some really great 

artists. It was just amazing, the quality and caliber of musicians you got to see several feet from you in someone’s living room. They would clear out the furniture, put 50 people in there on some loose chairs, and have a suggested donation of 15 to 20 dollars per person.

 

But of course now that can’t exist for a while in any environment, commercial or private—hopefully not as long as everybody’s predicting. Certainly when Mozart did his house concerts in the palace, he didn’t have to deal with a pandemic, and certainly didn’t have the internet to be able to convey his music to the masses. But people do now, and it’s amazing how many performers have jumped on this. They understand that the only way they can keep their music and their talents alive in the minds of their fans and the general public is through online presentations.

 

Whether it’s prerecorded videos or live streaming, some bands will go to great lengths to individually record their parts and overdub the video. And then somebody will put it together through video editing software and create a pretty amazing production.

 


In general, what is the level of quality you’ve been coming across over the past couple of months, from an acoustics perspective?

Most people are just finding a room in their home or their apartment—sometimes the bathroom, which everybody thinks has great acoustics. But that’s a little iffy—sometimes it’s good, sometimes it’s not. It can also be their kitchen, their living room, wherever they can set up an iPhone or a simple microphone. That’s the bare bones.

Performers are realizing they need to use this vehicle to get their music out there. And some are realizing they have to rise above the tide and separate themselves from the masses.

 

I get dozens of livestreams every day on my Facebook and other feeds, but I just don’t have time to listen to all of them. And that doesn’t even include the highly produced streams, like the Together at Home concert with Lady Gaga, Elton John, and others. So there has to be a way for artists—not just musicians, but actors and dancers, too—to convey their craft. But they have to step up the production. And the thing is, the ones I’ve seen do that haven’t had to spend thousands of dollars.

 

It’s really about thinking, “OK, what can I do to create an environment that will give me something better than what sounds like a typical living room? How can I get a little better balance? How can I get some good audio equipment? What do I need to do 

to make sure my video and audio are in sync?” I’ve seen some videos that were out of sync, which is very annoying.

 

They also need to think about lighting. How many people are doing livestreams with a window behind them? I’m not a lighting designer, but Lighting 101 tells us don’t have a window behind you.

 

 

I realize it’s difficult to advise people on acoustics from a distance, but is there any general advice you could give? For instance, they should probably take a moment to listen to the room they’re thinking of using and get a sense of its sonic characteristics.

Most normal rooms—living rooms, kitchens, bathrooms—don’t have a neutral sound, but tend to sound very colored. Bathrooms usually have an excessively bright sound because you’re dealing with porcelain and plaster and other hard surfaces with nothing to absorb it. Kitchens can sound like that too because they don’t have any soft furnishings, so they tend to emphasize the higher frequencies.

 

Living rooms, family rooms, and dens can have a very midrange boomy sound because you typically have all of the low-end sound sucked out—that is, absorbed—by the windows and the thin sheetrock and plaster. The high end can also be muffled by some of the furnishings, especially if you have carpet or area rugs.

 

And that’s really indicative of what I’m hearing on a lot on livestreams—that midrange honkiness that’s left once the highs and the lows are sucked out. It’s better to simply try to soak up or absorb some of that sound. I joke about it, but bringing every pillow and blanket in your house or apartment into the room while you’re recording will actually make a difference. But it depends. If you have a huge living room, just having three or four pillows is not going to do it.

 

If you want to take it to the next level, you can buy or make 

A BRIEF SAMPLING OF STREAMS
Steve Haas on High-Quality Livestreams

Brad Paisley and special guests perform
in real time on Facebook 

The Doobie Brothers perform a video
sync-up of “Black Water”

Steve Haas on High-Quality Livestreams

Singer Maysa Leak (of Incognito fame)

your own acoustical panels. It’s pretty easy, getting some insulation boards, which are typically about one or two inches thick, and wrapping fabric around them. It doesn’t have to be pretty, but it certainly can be very effective.

 

As a practitioner and somebody who designs spaces to sound fantastic, I don’t typically advocate the DIY approach to acoustical treatment. But, my goodness, in this situation we’re in, why not get something that will improve your recordings, improve your livestreaming, and set yourself apart a bit for a modest cost?

 

 

I know there are a lot of variables, but in general, should they be using smaller spaces?

It really does depend on what a space is giving you sonically. It’s all about the balance. Does it sound neutral? You can get a large space that has enough furnishings and other things to create that neutral sound, and have the added benefit of giving 

you a really nice visual backdrop, too.

 

There’s this thing going around the internet, a father and daughter out of Utah—Shaw, I think is their last name. They’ve gotten millions of hits for the songs they sing together. They sound wonderful and they’re in a very nice, voluminous living room. And yet you don’t hear excessive reverberation or other imbalanced sound because they seem to have paid attention to their room’s acoustics.

One option is to create the performance in two parts. I’ve heard people say they’ve recorded their audio literally in a closet to get the best sound possible and then dubbed it on the video. There’s nothing wrong with that, especially if you’re trying to get high-quality sound and visuals. They may not always go hand in hand.

 

 

I don’t want to go too far into the weeds, but how much impact does microphone selection or placement have on all this?

If they’re recording the audio and video at the same time and their space isn’t perfect, it makes a huge difference. There are professional artists where you can see they’re using closely held wireless or wired mics. And if you don’t have a balanced room, that allows the sound to be picked up much better without getting too much of the room. You want to make sure you have the best-quality microphone you can find with what you have to work with. You also want to make sure the mic’s control pattern is fairly narrow so it’s not picking up too much of the area around you.

 

 

I realize no one can know the future for sure, but where would like to see all of this go from here?

It’s great that during these difficult times people are still keeping that sensation of live music. We’ve been witnessing what I call the one-to-many type of presentations, whether it’s a single artist or band delivering a song or a performance or the big 

production concerts such as Together at Home. The Metropolitan Opera just did one. And I heard of a hip-hop artist who actually did one on Fortnite, a gaming platform. So everybody’s finding unique ways to deliver that one-to-many experience.

 

I do think the next step, as this continues, is that homeowners who can afford it will say, “You 

know what? I want a private concert.” Even if they have to do it on the big screen in their home theater and have Elton John or another type of artist use two-way communication where the performer can hear them applaud and they can interact in conversation between songs, ask questions, or whatever. That way they can react to the performance in a one-to-one or one-to-a-family or small-group situation.

 

I look forward to that happening because it really is amazing when you can have that experience with an artist. If they can’t physically be in the same room with you, then get the next best thing and have them be on Zoom or another stable platform. Have that same type of experience and same type of two-way communications instead of one-way. Feel the intimacy of the performance.

Steve Haas is the Principal Consultant of SH Acoustics, with offices in the NYC & LA
areas. He has been a leading acoustic and audio design & calibration expert for more
than 25 years in high-end spaces ranging from home theaters, studios, and live music
rooms to major museums and performance venues.

Michael Gaughn—The Absolute Sound, The Perfect Vision, Wideband, Stereo Review,
Sound & Vision, The Rayva Roundtablemarketing, product design, some theater designs,
couple TV shows, some commercials, and now this.

5 Classic Offbeat Sci-Fi Films

5 Classic Offbeat Sci-Fi Films

Gattaca

Science fiction is a genre almost as vast as space itself, and even its sub-genres can be approached in wildly varying ways by filmmakers. Stepping away from Hollywood’s beaten path to indies and smaller releases can uncover astonishing imagination and daring. The following movies, all dealing with space travel and/or aliens, demonstrate this range. From energetic heroes tearing past the stars to exhausted travelers who never asked for such a strange life, these movies represent a bit of all of us.

 

 

THE LAST STARFIGHTER (1984)

Thanks to the original Star Wars in 1977, space became a cinematic backdrop for both individual heroism and humor. Like many movies of the ’80s, The Last Starfighter, directed by Nick Castle and written by Jonathan Betuel, tends toward a particular flavor of sweet goofiness. And while it hardly qualifies as lofty art, it’s a fun family movie with excellent alien 

5 Classic Offbeat Sci-fi Films

makeup that looks ahead to the creative wackiness of the Men in Black films.

 

A young man named Alex (Lance Guest) longs to escape from the trailer park where he grew up. He keeps his sanity by obsessively playing Starfighter, a video game. When he reaches the top 

level, he’s visited by an alien named Centauri (Robert Preston, resurrecting his Music Man slickness), who recruits Alex as a gunner for a real intergalactic war. Call it Tron meets War Games. In space.

 

Castle wisely had the spaceships and battle stations animated rather than photographed from models. This not only avoided the inevitable problems of making viable effects for a movie without a Star Wars-level budget, but it also fits thematically with the video game Alex pictures as he fights. Dan O’Herlihy turns in a touching performance as Grig, the turtle-faced alien who pilots Alex’s ship.     A / G / I / K / V / Y

 

 

GATTACA (1997)

The longing to escape also underpins the much more serious Gattaca, but the focus here is on the longing, not the escape itself. Ethan Hawke, as a man born without the genetic preselection that has become commonplace, must take on another identity in order to reach his lifelong dream of flying in space. The underlying theme here is defiance of societal prejudice.

Writer and director Andrew Niccol employs the trope of a future society that looks perfect and ordered until one scratches the surface to reveal its rotten foundation.

 

Visually and aurally, it’s a film of great beauty. Michael Nyman’s powerful score is the ideal match for the costumes and Oscar-nominated art direction, together evoking a sepia-toned Art Deco future world. The intriguing story, if a bit too reliant on narration, is given life by a fine cast: Jude Law as the man who sells his identity to Hawke on the black market and Uma Thurman as Hawke’s co-worker at the space-travel corporation, along with appearances by Tony Shalhoub, Ernest Borgnine, and Gore Vidal.
A / C / I / K / TV / Y

Where to See Some Sci-Fi

The letters after each movie description link to the major non-subscription streaming and download services that offer the title. Kaleidescape has all 5 films available for download in the best available quality. Gattaca is free on Crackle and Tubi, as is Midnight Special on Amazon Prime.

 

A = Amazon Prime / C = Crackle
G = Google Play / I = iTunes
K = Kaleidescape / T = Tubi
V = Vudu /
Y = YouTube

5 Classic Offbeat Sci-Fi Films

MOON (2009)

Not everyone in space wants to be there, as quickly becomes obvious in Moon. Laboring alone on a lunar energy-mining base, Sam Bell (Sam Rockwell) is nearing the end of his three-year contract and can hardly wait to get home to his wife and daughter. GERTY, the computer and its robotic extensions (voiced with HAL-like eeriness by Kevin Spacey), keeps asking Sam if he feels all right. We watch Sam struggle with sudden physical and mental problems until they quickly become extreme, and we wonder with him whether any or all of this is in his imagination. It eventually becomes clear that the movie’s theme is not solitude, but corporate exploitation of workers.

 

Director Duncan Jones won a BAFTA for this film debut. Gary Shaw’s cinematography is gritty and gray to evoke the lunar atmosphere as well as Sam’s emotional state, while the base interior glows threateningly through orange filters. While the visual illusions are very different from those usually needed in science fiction—I can’t explain without spoilers—they are integral to the plot and well enough executed that they don’t become an annoyance. After Sam’s battle to learn the truth of his own existence, the film’s final moments are psychologically satisfying if physically nonsensical.     A / G / I / K / V / Y     

 

 

HIGH LIFE (2018)

Solitude in space has a different context for Monte (Robert Pattinson) in High Life, directed by Claire Denis, who also co-wrote the screenplay with Jean-Pol Fargeau. Monte started his voyage with a dozen fellow violent convicts as part of an

experimental space-survival program, acommpanied by a supervising doctor (Juliette Binoche). For him, space is just another version of prison.

 

At the movie’s opening, Monte is the only one still alive, with the exception of a baby girl. We learn his backstory through the rapid intersection of his

5 Classic Offbeat Sci-Fi Films

memories, both from his early life on Earth and the more recent time on his current voyage when his co-travelers were still alive. This is a violent tale of blood and sex, society’s outcasts reduced to their most primal urges. In that sense, it’s a horror movie.

 

The sound engineering is raw and thrilling. Occasionally Stuart A. Staples and his band, Tindersticks, supply spooky electronic atmospherics, but Denis is not afraid of long stretches without music, letting the aging ship’s creaks and groans be the score.     A / G / K / V / Y

5 Classic Offbeat Sci-fi Films

MIDNIGHT SPECIAL (2016)

One might argue that this film is not about space or aliens. But there are many definitions of being not of this world, and while the child Alton (Jaeden Lieberher) was born of humans on Earth in our own time, he has powers that connect him with something beyond humanity.

 

In a feat of highly skilled storytelling, writer/director Jeff Nichols starts near the end of Alton’s story, yet explains what led to that point piecemeal throughout the movie without resorting to either flashbacks or the “info-dump” exposition so common in less well-crafted science fiction.

 

Michael Shannon is Alton’s father and a member of a cult called The Ranch, led by a pastor (Sam Shepard) whose sermons are interpretations of the mysterious phrases and numbers Alton speaks during his “fits.” Among those numbers are coordinates for satellites, which alerts the FBI to Alton’s existence. Alton’s father and a friend, Lucas (Joel Edgerton), are trying to bring Alton to a certain place at a certain time, without knowing why; the cult leadership pursues them, wanting Alton back; the Feds chase both parties, thinking a terrorist attack is in the offing.

 

Despite this complex, high-stakes plot, the hallmark of this film is its underlying calm. Nichols hints at violence without showing it, thus maximizing the impact of the violent onscreen episode that starts Act Three. Throughout, the small-mindedness and greed of those in power is muted by acts of love—the father’s sacrifices for his son, Lucas learning to reopen his heart to a friend he lost to a cult, a social scientist (Adam Driver) who really listens, and a mother (Kirsten Dunst, in the best work of her career) who understands that someone can belong to this world and another at the same time.
A / G / I / K / V / Y

Anne E. Johnson

Anne E. Johnson is a freelance writer in Brooklyn. Her music journalism appears
regularly in
Copper Magazine, Classical Voice North America, and Stereophile. She’s
also the author of several novels and over 100 short stories, mostly science fiction
and fantasy. Learn more on AnneEJohnson.com.