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Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey

Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey

We benefit from yet another film that received a fast-tracked release to home video, one that just came out in theaters on February 7—though I’m not even entirely sure what to call it, as Warner Brothers was nearly as conflicted with the title as Harley Quinn herself. The film originally released with the nonsensical and absolute mouthful Birds of Prey: And the Fantabulous Emancipation of One Harley Quinn, but when that didn’t resonate with moviegoers, they changed it to Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey, a title that puts the emphasis where it belongs.

I was a fan of DC comics growing up, but I’ll admit that my knowledge of the DC universe is fairly limited to the members of the Justice League—Superman, Batman, Green Lantern, Wonder Woman, The Flash, etc.—and while Harley is a member of the extended DC Universe, I really didn’t know much about her character.

 

Those who watched 2016’s Suicide Squad were introduced to Harley (Margot Robbie) as she joined a band of misfits to perform deadly missions in exchange for a reduced prison sentence. With a Rotten Tomatoes score of just 27%, the film wasn’t well-received. However, Harley was the movie’s highpoint, and she generated enough excitement to get her own spinoff here. While Birds doesn’t feel tied to Squad in any way, there is one brief moment where the “Daddy’s Lil Monster” shirt Harley wore in Squad is held up, which places the movie in that continuity.

 

Which is all a roundabout way of saying that if you aren’t a 

PREY AT A GLANCE

Another entry in the emerging genre of man-hating action films, Birds of Prey tends be as confusing and hard to follow as its heroine, but features lots of fight scenes to keep superhero fans engaged.

 

PICTURE     

The 4K transfer does a terrific job of handling the spectrum from the usual Gotham City gloom to shimmering golds, glittering sequins, and the bright neons of fireworks.

 

SOUND

The Dolby Atmos soundtrack is active and engaging, with appropriate impact, but Quinn’s VOs are too forward and loud in the mix.

hardcore comic-book geek, or haven’t seen all the DC movies, or don’t know anything about Harley Quinn, the movie brings you up to speed on everything you need to know about Harley’s backstory in the opening minutes.

 

Essentially, Harley grows up with a bad father, goes to school and gets her PhD in psychology, and then goes to work at Gotham City’s infamous Arkham Asylum, where she is assigned to treat The Joker. Over time, she falls in love with him, and, well, he kind of drives her insane. (Those hoping for any more of Joaquin Phoenix as The Joker are out of luck. An uncredited Joker has just a snippet of screen time in a flashback and we only see the back of his head. Also, no cameos by the caped crusader.)

 

Birds begins after Mr. J has broken up with Harley, and now she is forced to figure things out and survive in a Gotham where she has made a lot of enemies and no longer has The Joker’s protection.

 

While Harley frenetically bumbles through life, she ends up at a nightclub owned by main baddie Roman Sionis (Ewan McGregor). When Sionis’ driver is incapacitated, he ends up making club singer Black Canary (Jurnee Smollett-Bell) his new driver, forcing her deeper into his seedy world.

 

After a diamond embedded with account numbers is pickpocketed from one of Sionis’ enforcers by young Cassandra Cain (Ella Jay Basco), Harley volunteers to find the diamond in exchange for Sionis not killing her, setting her off on her quest.

 

While this is going on, a separate story develops about a crossbow-wielding vigilante calling herself The Huntress (Mary Elizabeth Winstead), who is going around the city and killing crime-family members, while being pursued by Gotham City detective, Renee Montoya (Rosie Perez).

 

These stories all weave separately, with characters occasionally bumping into each other until they finally intertwine, forcing the females to band together to fight off an army of masked criminals Sionis has assembled to kill them all and retrieve the diamond.

 

Phew.

 

If that all sounds a bit confusing and a tad hard to follow, well, it kind of is. Nothing that Harley does seems planned or thought out, with everything just a spontaneous impulse based on sudden emotion or reaction. Right away, we see that she is totally lost without The Joker, telling us that “a harlequin’s role is to serve,” and they are nothing without their master.

 

The film also teaches that men, even trusted friends, will screw you over and that “if you want boys to respect you, you have to show you’re serious; blow something up, shoot someone.” The emancipated Harley doesn’t take anything from any man, paying back any sleight or offense with maximum pain.

 

The story is a bit schizophrenic at times, often jumping backwards in time as Harley’s mind puts things together, or adding new pieces of information helping to make sense of things and fill in the holes.

 

Prey looks terrific. Shot on Arriraw at 3.4K resolution, this transfer is taken from a true 4K digital intermediate, and it shows. Images are gloriously sharp, with razor clarity and depth. Shots framed in tight focus leap off the screen, such as one closeup of an egg sandwich being cooked that reveals every texture and sharp edge and looked like a cinematic Food Network cooking demo. You can see every pore and line in actors’ faces, and the makeup and tattoos covering Harley. Wide exterior shots have a full field of focus that is almost three-dimensional.

 

The movie also has a bright and often hyper-vibrant color palette that looks fantastic in HDR. An early scene has neon-colored fireworks going off amidst brilliant-red fireball explosions. Costumes and backgrounds burst with color, with lots of shimmering golds and glittering silver sequins that shine and sparkle.

 

Because it’s Gotham, there are a lot of night and dark scenes, and blacks are deep and clean. Headlights, street lights, and the flashing blue and red police lights all pop off the screen. A final scene is on a misty and foggy pier, with lots of greys that are lit by dim and bright lights, which can be a total compression and banding nightmare, but these images remain solid, stable, and noise-free.

 

Sonically, Prey includes a Dolby Atmos soundtrack that is pretty active and engaging, and that makes frequent use of the height speakers.

 

City scenes have appropriate ambient street noises, and the nightclub takes on an entirely different sonic character, especially when Black Canary is singing and her voice has the reverb and ambience of being in a small jazz club. The Fun

House at the end also does a nice job getting playful with the audio mix, with lots of sounds coming from overhead.

 

There are a lot of fight scenes throughout the movie, and these have a lot sonic excitement. Gunshots have an appropriate snap and dynamics, and explosions energize the room with bass energy. During one scene, Harley attacks a police station with her “Fun Gun,” a weapon that shoots different non-lethal ammunition, and these projectiles launch with a solid thunk. When she fires off some gas rounds, you hear the smoke hissing into the room and overhead, and other rounds burst a confetti spray over the room.

 

Another fight happens in a prison hallway flooded with water. First is the sound of the water pouring overhead from the sprinkler system, and later you hear all of the splashes and individual water droplets spraying around the room.

 

I was a little concerned because Harley routinely narrates her thoughts, other characters’ backstories, or what is happening in a voiceover that booms across the front three channels. At first, I thought that overall dialogue levels were going to be way too loud and uncomfortably forward-sounding, and I ended up cutting the volume back a good bit from my usual reference. But it is just

Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey

Harley’s VOs that are recorded at a louder, forward, and in-your-face level. I think this would have played better—and been a far more playful use of the mix—had these VOs been mixed up into the height speakers, but I didn’t get to weigh-in. Fortunately, most of the dialogue is “correctly” mixed and easy to understand.

 

While this is a “comic book” movie, it is most definitely not family-friendly fare. There is a lot of swearing throughout, as well as some fairly graphic violence including physical abuse to women as well as one character that likes to, umm, cut peoples’ faces off. So, yeah, not for kids. But for the adults looking for a night in with a total break from reality, Birds of Prey is a sonic and visual feast that will make a home theater shine.

John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

Dark Waters (2019)

Dark Waters (2019)

As the title suggests, Todd Haynes’ film Dark Waters is no light piece of fluffy escapism, and its tone and weight feel even darker and heavier given the current state of the world. It is a film that forces you to confront sickness, death, and corruption head-on, like Robert Bilott, the protagonist of the story, convincingly underplayed by Mark Ruffalo. Based on a true story, you will be both disturbed and riveted.

The film opens on a warm night in Parkersburg, West Virginia in 1975 when a trio of teenagers sneak onto private property, shuck off their clothes, and take a dip in the lake. A few seconds later, they are swiftly kicked out by the authorities, two men in a small power boat bearing the name “West Virginia Containment Services.” The men are in the midst of spraying a mysterious chemical onto the water’s surface as one of them shouts to the other, “Turn off the beam, fool!”, referring to the boat’s spotlight. Whatever they’re doing, it’s meant to be a secret.

 

Cut to 1998 in Cincinnati, where Robert Bilott (Ruffalo), a recent partner at the corporate law firm of Taft, Stettinius and Hollister, is paid an unexpected visit by a farmer from Parkersburg seeking his help. Wilbur Tennant (Bill Camp) 

DARK WATERS AT A GLANCE

This frightening, powerful true story of DuPont Chemical’s poisoning of a small West Virginia town features a strong performance from Mark Ruffalo as the lawyer who uncovers the truth.

 

PICTURE

The film is well made, but relies on a blue filter effect that’s distracting and ultimately unnecessary.

 

SOUND

Composer Marcelo Zavros’ score is particularly effective. 

claims that DuPont is poisoning his farm’s creek and thereby killing the animals—and he has proof. He needs a lawyer, though, and he wants Bilott, whose grandma lives in Parkersburg. Only problem is that Bilott defends chemical companies, he doesn’t sue them.

 

Bilott refuses at first, but a nagging curiosity brings him to Tennant’s farm in West Virginia, and what he sees there cannot be unseen—190 dead cows, people getting sick, and a mysterious landfill belonging to DuPont. Bilott eventually takes the case, as he is the only lawyer willing to face the juggernaut chemical company. Dark suspicions and alarming evidence begin piling up, as does the paperwork Bilott must sift through to uncover the horrible truth. It will take him many years to find it, and at what cost? His career? His family? His life?

 

Mark Ruffalo gives one of his best performances as “The Lawyer Who Became DuPont’s Worst Nightmare”, which is the title of the New York Times Magazine article by Nathaniel Rich from which the screenplay (by Mario Correa and Matthew Michael Carnahan) is adapted. The supporting cast is equally strong and includes Tim Robbins, Bill Pullman, Mare Winningham, Bill Camp (heart-breaking as Wilbur Tennant), and Anne Hathaway, particularly compelling as Bilott’s wife, Sarah.

 

The music score by Marcelo Zarvos is effective and in one scene, the use of the John Denver hit, “Take Me Home, Country Roads” was particularly eerie juxtaposed with the film’s grim circumstances.

 

The look of the film, however, is its one weak spot. Nearly every scene is layered with a blue filter, used in an effort to manipulate the tone of the film, to make it feel somber and serious. The effect is overbearing and relentless. When we first see Tennant’s farm, for example, it is a dreary, blue day, and then when we revisit the farm more than a decade later, it looks exactly the same. The weather has not changed one iota. Did Haynes film it all on the same day using the same blue filter? His film does not need to rely on gimmicks. Dark Waters is an excellent movie; well-shot, well-scored, well-edited and well-acted, and these elements alone give us the tone. No filters necessary.

 

Despite this one qualm, Dark Waters is both frightening and powerful, and stands alongside the best of its genre like Silkwood, A Civil Action, and Erin Brockovich. It’s so scary, in fact, I wouldn’t be surprised if, after seeing it, you find yourself going through your kitchen cabinets and throwing out some of your non-stick pots and pans. Be afraid, be very afraid.

Glenn Bassett

Glenn Bassett lives in Manhattan with husband Gerard and their two cats. Most recently, he
was set designer for a production of
On Golden Pond at The Katherine Hepburn Cultural Arts
Center in Connecticut and for the Salt Marsh Opera’s 
production of Pagliacci. He was production
designer on the upcoming independent shorts 
Dollars and Sense and Marble-eyed Tanner and
designed and illustrated the poster and album 
cover for Forbidden Broadway: The Next Generation.
Current writing projects include a mystery novel set in Provincetown, MA and an original musical
thriller, 
Dig a Little Deeper.

Altered Carbon (Season 2)

Altered Carbon (Season 2)

For those of you unfamiliar with this Netflix series, Altered Carbon is set around 360 years into the future, with Season 2 taking place 30 years after Season 1. Based on the brilliant book by Richard K. Morgan, Altered Carbon is centered on the exploits of Takeshi Kovacs, formerly an Envoy—a highly-trained and feared soldier—and now a private investigator.

 

In this future world, a person’s consciousness can live indefinitely, downloaded into a “stack,” a device made possible by the discovery of not-entirely-understood alien technology that can be implanted into a “sleeve,” or newly-grown body—which 

doesn’t necessarily have to be the one they had before. The only way a person can be truly killed is if the stack is destroyed or if they can’t afford a new body. The alien material from which the stacks are made is found only on Kovacs’ home planet Harlan’s World. As such, it’s extremely valuable, the stuff of wars.

 

(Non-spoiler alert: Unlike many lazily done reviews that consist of a give-it-all-away plot summary and the reviewer concluding, “I liked it” or “I didn’t like it,” I’m not going to reveal any of the key points for anyone here.)

 

Takeshi Kovacs has been re-sleeved—but in a new body, played by new lead Anthony Mackie, who gives Season 2 an entirely different feel. Mackie’s Kovacs is more charismatic and has more empathy and a wider emotional range than the previous two Kovacs, played by

CARBON AT A GLANCE

More pedestrian, less mind-blowing, than Season 1, but better than most of the other comic book-style sci-fi out there.

 

PICTURE     

Dazzling visuals in the Blade Runner neo-noir tradition.

 

SOUND

More restrained than the visuals but just as impressive—except for some occasional musical miscues.

the reserved Will Yun Lee and the stereotypical Tough Big Guy Joel Kinnaman. Mackie (known for playing Falcon in the  Marvel movies), dominates the screen with a can’t-take-your-eyes-off-him presence and physicality, yet gives room for his co-actors to breathe. He brings nuance and, yes, even a little humor to the role in the midst of a grim future world.

 

Ostensibly brought back to Harlan’s World to solve a murder, Kovacs soon finds himself immersed in political intrigue, double-crossing, and other conflicts. He’s also reunited with love-of-his-life Quellcrist Falconer (Renée Elise Goldsberry), who created the stacks, who Kovacs has been pursuing across planets and timespans, and who is a key element in all that’s happening. Goldsberry is utterly convincing as the once heroic, now traumatized Falconer.

 

As in the first season, real and virtual reality and human and AI characters mix. The characters and actors are a mixed bag. Simone Messick (Misty Knight in the Marvel Cinematic Universe) plays bounty hunter Trepp with an oddly effective combination of tough-girl steel and compassion for those she cares for. My favorite of the bunch, Chris Conner, plays Poe,

Kovacs’ right-hand “man,” as a funny, flawed, insecure, and lovable AI character. You read “lovable” right—in Altered Carbon Season 2, Poe (modeled after Edgar Allan Poe), along with fellow AI and friend Dig 301 (Dina Shihabi), are the most “human” characters and the actors displaying the greatest range of emotions. Poe suffers from a programming glitch and Dig 301 seeks a sense of purpose. In fact, the most touching scenes in the series are between the two of them.

 

Less believable are Lela Loren as Harlan’s World leader Danica Harlan, who never quite projects the steely ruthlessness the character requires, and Torben Liebrecht 

as a flat, one-dimensional Colonel Ivan Carrera. Perhaps this is how the directors wanted these characters played, but the result is that they aren’t as convincing as they should be. Oliver Rice is perfect though as Stone, Harlan’s assistant, the kind of obsequious toady occupying boardrooms and capitals everywhere.

 

As in Season 1, the visuals are dazzling. The claustrophobic feel owes a debt to Blade Runner and William Gibson’s Sprawl trilogy, like so many other science-fiction shows, yet the look of the series is striking, from the honeycomb/alien motifs in Harlan’s palace to the neon-gritty street scenes and 3D computers-of-tomorrow graphics. When characters enter virtual reality, colors and perspectives are shifted in ways that seem surreal and hyper-real at the same time. Season 2 is an entirely believable portrayal of how the world could look around 350 years from now. (Be aware: As in the first season, the show doesn’t shy away from violence.)

 

The soundscapes complement the visuals (save for an occasional bout of overdramatic musical cheesiness) with almost subliminal insinuation into the viewer’s consciousness at times, interwoven with and part and parcel of the fabric of the presentation. That’s a compliment.

 

So. Altered Carbon Season 2 has all the ingredients of sensational sci-fi—but it doesn’t scale the mind-blowing heights of Season 1. The plotlines are more straightforward, less twisted and surprising, more pedestrian. The first season deeply explored themes like: What does it mean to be immortal? What does it feel like to be able to switch bodies and sexes? What are the social implications of the rich being able to enjoy these things, while the poor cannot? How far will someone go to gain power over others to ensure they have access to immortality?

 

However, Season 2 glosses over these ideas, becoming more of an us-versus-them narrative. Ironically, while the latest Takeshi Kovacs is more nuanced and multifaceted than the previous ones, most of the rest of the supporting characters are not.

 

That’s not to say Season 2 is bad—far from it. I dislike ratings, but for perspective, if the first season was an A, the new one is a B-minus, and the show is a heck of a lot better than some of the comic-book dreck shi-fi out there. Is it worth watching? Yes. (And it stands on its own. You don’t have to watch Season 1 first to enjoy it.) There are enough plot twists and surprises to keep things interesting, and the visuals are gripping. But I missed that rocketing adrenaline sense of wonder of its predecessor.

 

There’s talk of a Season 3, and there’s also the animated Altered Carbon: Resleeved, which I haven’t seen yet. It’ll be interesting to see how they stack up.

Frank Doris

Frank Doris is the chief cook & bottle washer for Frank Doris/Public Relations and works with a
number of audio & music industry clients. He’s a professional guitarist and a vinyl enthusiast with
multiple turntables and thousands of records.

Hedwig and the Angry Inch

Hedwig and the Angry Inch

I have been a fan of the musical and movie versions of Hedwig and the Angry Inch for a very long time and take a certain amount of pride knowing that I was in on the phenomenon quite early. I got into the original cast recording when the show was still in its infancy. We even flew from California to New York in 1999 primarily to see the show when it was still way Off 

Broadway down on Jane Street in Greenwich Village. Michael Cerveris was starring in the production then; I think he was the second Hedwig, right after creator John Cameron Mitchell.

 

Hedwig was everything I expected and more. I came home abuzz, trying to tell as many people as I could about this amazing music and production. I even convinced a one-off cover band I was in for a special benefit concert to do “Wicked Little Town”—which confused many in the audience, who had no clue what we were playing, yet it excited the handful who were hip to it. (I have a recording of that somewhere.) I’ve seen other productions of the show since, including most recently Mitchell’s fabulous Origin of Love concert tour, which was extremely rewarding—I finally got to see the original Hedwig!

HEDWIG AT A GLANCE

Criterion does its typically superb job of presenting this glam/punk/pop musical classic on Blu-ray.

 

PICTURE

Wonderful 4K transfer, but maybe a little too faithful to the original film, retaining more grain than contemporary audiences are used to.

 

SOUND

The 5.1 mix is warm and inviting, but way too conservative for a rock ‘n’ roll film that could use a little rear-channel action. 

The music of Hedwig and the Angry Inch is spectacular, springboarding off of an early-’70s glam-punk-pop template shaped by David Bowie, Marc Bolin (T-Rex), Lou Reed, and Iggy Pop. Mitchell and songwriter/lyricist Stephen Trask crafted a grand rock musical so compelling that Hedwig has enjoyed performances around the globe, including a successful Broadway run in 2014 starring Neil Patrick Harris.

 

When I recently learned about a Blu-ray release of the film version of Hedwig and the Angry Inch, which had sneaked out last year, I scurried over to Amoeba Music and found their last copy. Thus, our review here today . . .

 

Generally, I’m quite pleased with this new edition from Criterion. Packaging-wise, it has a very different look from the original DVD version, more in keeping with the show’s artful, Germanic, drag-punk aesthetic. With its wild hand-drawn angular lettering and such, the design feels like some alternate-universe German silent film akin to The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari. The original movie art looked nothing like that.

Hedwig and the Angry Inch

Those are details not lost on me given the story’s genesis (which I assume you know . . . but if you don’t, please click here for a link to the Wiki that can help bring you up to speed).

 

The picture quality on the Criterion Blu-ray of Hedwig and the Angry Inch is quite wonderful, restored at 4K. The colors are beautiful, with a very distinct sense of film grain. The latter detail is both appealing and distracting, and I admit I’m a bit on the fence about how I feel about this. I know it’s the most authentic vision, representative of how the film should look, but perhaps we see almost too much grain. I wouldn’t change it, of course. But I do need to acknowledge this, for what it’s worth. 

 

The detailing is nonetheless quite lovely, especially in the closeups. The ruby slipper-like sparkle on Hedwig’s lips is pretty incredible!

 

The detailed booklet in this Criterion issue features all 

manner of behind-the-scenes images and insights, including artwork tracing the character’s evolution. The bonus materials are essential, including a charming memory piece where John Cameron Mitchell explores his archives, telling stories of how Hedwig came together, illustrated with rare memorabilia and video footage. (Some of this section mirrors tales he told on his recent Origin of Love concert tour.) The interviews with cast and crew are revealing and enlightening. I’m still going through these materials, but so far I am very pleased.

 

My only disappointment with this edition of Hedwig and the Angry Inch involves the sound. The 5.1 DTS HD Master Audio surround sound mix was a letdown—it is effectively a stereo mix with generic room ambience in the rear channels. It would have been nice to hear even a little bit of discrete activity in those channels! Maybe we will get that in a Super Deluxe Edition version somewhere down the pike.

 

That said, the mix does ultimately treat the music very nicely, sounding warm and inviting, almost analog at times. Accordingly, Hedwig and the Angry Inch sounds its best when you play it loud—after all, rock ‘n’ roll should be played at full volume! So if you love this movie musical and decide to get this new Criterion edition, don’t hesitate to turn up your amplifier to 11 for maximum rock ’n’ roll velocity.

 

You won’t regret it.

Mark Smotroff

Mark Smotroff breathes music 24/7. His collection includes some 10,000 LPs, thousands of
CDs & downloads, and many hundreds of Blu-ray and DVD Audio discs. Professionally, Mark has
provided Marketing Communications services to the likes of DTS, Sony, Sega, Sharp, and AT&T.
He is also a musician, songwriter & producer, and has written about music professionally for
publications including Mix, Sound+Vision, and AudiophileReview. When does he sleep?

Onward

Onward

By all normal logic, you should not be reading this review right now. Disney/Pixar’s latest film, Onward, was just released theatrically on March 6, and with an opening gross of $103 million—and status as the #1 movie in the United States—it was already well on its way to becoming the studio’s next mega-hit.

 

But then the world went topsy-turvy and all the commercial cinemas closed, forcing studios to make a difficult and unprecedented decision: Wait until theaters reopen and hope interest for these movies is still there, or release them in non-

traditional ways. (You can read my post “Hollywood Dives Deep Into Day & Date to see more on this fascinating development.)

 

Like others, Disney chose to greatly accelerate the home release date for Onward, making it available for purchase on digital download just two weeks after its theatrical debut. And, like Frozen II, Onward will also see a far earlier release date for streaming on Disney+, arriving there on April 3.

 

These plans came about so abruptly that digital retailers like Kaleidescape and Vudu didn’t even receive the 4K HDR files. However, in another unusual move from Disney, the company is using “harmonized pricing” for users purchasing Onward, meaning that one price—$26.99 in the case of Kaleidescape—gets you access to the film in HD resolution now with rights to download the UHD and 4K HDR versions when they are available.

ONWARD AT A GLANCE

Pixar had another mega-hit on its hands before it was forced to take this heartfelt but fun D&D-derived tale of loss & redemption out of theaters and straight to the home market.

 

PICTURE     

Picks up where the groundbreaking Toy Story 4 left off, with photorealistic graphics and dazzling effects.

 

SOUND

The adventurous mix—7.1 in the current version, but with an Atmos upgrade due soon—features plenty of pans, ambience, and bass.

So, with that preamble out of the way, we can proceed with the review . . .

 

Onward is set in the fantasy world of New Mushroomton, a world long ago that was filled with adventure and wonder and magic. But magic wasn’t easy to master, and over time, it faded away, and now it is a forgotten skill replaced by technology. I mean, why struggle learning to cast a light spell or rely on a wizard when now everyone can just walk over and flip a switch?

 

This setting is one of the first unique things for Pixar, in that the film is set in an entirely fantastical world. Every other Pixar film has been set to some degree in the “real world.” Whether it is the distant future of Wall-E, the underground insect world of A Bug’s Life, inside Riley’s head in Inside Out, or the alternate reality of The Good Dinosaur, Pixar’s world-building has thus

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far been built around our reality. (Even Monstropolis from Monsters, Inc. and Monsters University is tied to our world, as the monsters cross over into our side of the closet door on multiple occasions.)

 

Onward also features some deep ties to fantasy role-playing games like Dungeons & Dragons and Magic: The Gathering, with tons of references overt and subtle that fans of these games will pick up and love, specifically one gelatinous monster that even passing D&D fans will be familiar with. The movie’s substitute for these is Quests of Yore, “A historically based role-playing scenario.”

In a way, it reminded me of a “Weird” Al Yankovic song like “All About the Pentiums.” You can enjoy the song on the surface for what it is, but the deeper you are into geek culture, the more you’ll appreciate its brilliance on different layers. Pixar is known for littering Easter eggs throughout its films. Onward features more references and hidden jokes than perhaps any other, and the home release allows you to pause and analyze scenes to loot-hunt these treasures at your leisure.

 

Whether it’s The Lion King, Bambi, Frozen, Finding Nemo, or numerous other films, a common theme among Disney heroes is having lost a parent, often in some tragic manner. But no film tackles this subject head-on quite like Onward, where the entire plot revolves around the opportunity to bring back a lost parent, to spend one last day with him. Also, for the first time we hear Disney characters not only talking about the pain and loss of losing a parent, but of the emotions of having to deal with a parent that is sick and dying. Heavy stuff for a “kid’s” movie.

 

The film focuses on elven brothers Ian (Tom Holland) and Barley Lightfoot (Chris Pratt) some 16 years after their father has died. On Ian’s 16th birthday, their mom, Laurel (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) unveils a present their father left behind for when both boys were over 16. Inside the present are a wizard’s staff, a rare Phoenix Gem, and instructions for casting a “visitation spell” that will allow the dad to return for a single day to see how the boys have grown. Of course, things go awry when casting the spell, and Dad only returns from the waist down before the Phoenix Gem—an assist element required for casting powerful magic—is destroyed.

 

This sets up the campaign quest, as the brothers—and the lower-half of dad—head off in Barley’s sweet-van, Guinevere (fueled by an appropriately epic mixtape, of course), to follow clues left behind from the magic of old to discover another 

Phoenix Gem and finish casting the spell before the sun sets, and Dad is again lost forever.

 

Pixar inhabits this fantasy world with all manner of creatures, including gnomes, pixies, mermaids, unicorns, centaurs, cyclops, and goblins, which keeps scenes visually entertaining. In keeping with the RPG “rules,” different character classes have different abilities; and it is the shy and awkward Ian (whose name might be

Onward

a subtle nod to Sir Ian McKellen, who played a certain wizard named Gandalf the Grey in a few Tolkien films) who develops the ability to use the wizard’s staff to cast spells rather than his RPG-obsessed, living the “longest gap year ever” non-starter brother, Barley, perpetually wearing a jean vest emblazoned with patches and buttons of Metal-like band names and a 20-sided die, like so many of the kids I went to high-school with in the ‘80s.

 

And like any epic quest, the story begins at an all-too common starting point: The Tavern. From Chaucer’s Tale to Hobbiton’s Green Dragon Inn to numerous D&D campaigns, the Tavern is often the place where parties gather to palaver prior to beginning their journey. In this case, the Tavern is run by a Manticore (Octavia Spencer), a mythical creature with “a vaguely humanoid head, the body of a lion, and the wings of a dragon [whose] long tail ends in a cluster of deadly spikes,” according to D&D rules. With magic gone, our Manticore has lost its bite, and the tavern is now more a family-friendly TGI Friday’s affair. But it serves as the launching point for the brothers’ adventure—as well as a way for the Manticore to do some self-discovery—and provides the first clue to tracking down the Gem.

 

As mentioned at the outset, this review is of the HD version, which looks fantastic in its own right, but it definitely left me eager to see this visual glory all over again but in higher resolution, and with the added color and punch of HDR, when the 4K HDR release becomes available.

 

As literally every pixel shown on screen is rendered in computer, we get an amazing level of detail, especially in closeups. Here, literally every strand of hair or fur is visible in perfect detail, as are things like the grain in desks or the stones in walls. Other things have a photo-realistic quality, such as slices of bread, vehicles, or wet roads. Pixar continues upping the ante in computer visuals, and Onward picks up where the gorgeous Toy Story 4 left off.

Lighting effects are dazzling, whether it is fire, sparkling magic, or light streaming in through windows. Dark spaces like caves or night scenes make for especially vibrant eye candy. 

 

As is the case with every Disney release I am aware of, the digital HD version—and Blu-ray disc on release—doesn’t contain the object-based Dolby Atmos soundtrack, which is reserved for the premium 4K content. Instead, Onward’s HD version has a 7.1-channel DTS-HD Master audio soundtrack.

 

While I can’t wait to audition the Atmos track when the 4K version drops, this mix offers plenty to enjoy. There are strong panning and surround effects tracking the onscreen action, especially during the driving scenes on the expressway and the final challenge quest in the tunnels, where multiple objects whiz past your head. Even with the 7.1-channel mix, my processor’s upmixer smartly put sounds up into the ceiling, such as a dragon’s tail swiping overhead or fire breathing across the room. Outdoor scenes feature tons of ambient sounds to place you in the action, and bass is deep and authoritative when called for. I find dialogue to be slightly forward with DTS mixes, but I had no difficulty understanding all the lines.

Onward

Of course, the brilliance of Pixar is in making movies that appeal to a broad range of viewers, and not just for that small subset of hardcore fans of a specific genre or RPG subculture. Unlike any other studio, Pixar has a knack for writing stories and jokes that play across multiple levels. Kids appreciate the top-level humor, with other jokes and references for adults, and deeper meanings and storytelling themes that parents recognize.

 

Ultimately, Onward is Pixar doing what it does best, which is creating movies about deep relationships and going right for the feels at the end. Whether you’re a beginning Level 1 Crafty Rogue or a veteran Level 20 Wizard, there is plenty in Onward to engage and entertain family members of all ages.

John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

Hollywood Dives Deep Into Day & Date

Hollywood Dives Deep Into Day & Date

Those who listened carefully—and knew how to read the signs—heard the first domino fall a few weeks ago when MGM delayed the release of No Time to Die, the upcoming 25th James Bond film, from an original opening date of April 3 to November 12 in light of the recent virus outbreak. At the time, it seemed a pretty drastic decision to push the opening of such a tentpole film seven months, especially after so much had already been committed to and spent on advertising.

 

Following that, we saw other premieres cancelled, as studios delayed movies in the uncertain market. The next big domino to drop was announcements from major cinema chains saying they would be voluntarily cutting capacity in auditoriums and limiting ticket sales to 50% in an effort to encourage social distancing. But as the outbreak continued to spread, pretty much all of the commercial cinemas soon shut their doors.

 

Along the way, other studios followed MGM’s example of pushing back release dates of upcoming major titles. Things like Mulan, A Quiet Place Part II, Black Widow, and F9 have all been delayed; some by months, some with no new scheduled release. We also saw multiple studios halting production of major films currently in the works such as James Cameron’s

Avatar sequels, Matrix 4, The Batman, Jurassic World: Dominion, and many more.

 

The next domino to drop was by Disney last weekend when the company upped the digital release date of Star Wars: Episode IX—The Rise of Skywalker a few days, followed almost immediately by the announcement it would be making Frozen II available on its Disney+ streaming service months earlier than planned.

 

Then the biggest domino of them all (so far . . .) dropped this past Monday, March 16 when Universal 

Hollywood Dives Deep Into Day & Date
Hollywood Dives Deep Into Day & Date

Studios announced it would be making three films still early in their theatrical runs available for viewing at home in a premium-video-on-demand release: The Invisible Man (released theatrically on February 28), Emma (released theatrically on March 6), and The Hunt (which just opened at theaters on March 13). As of today, you can watch any of these movies in the comfort of your own home without any special hardware for just $19.99 on platforms like Vudu, Fandango Now, or iTunes.

 

Even more surprising, in that same announcement, Universal also said that its upcoming Trolls sequel, Trolls World Tour, would debut on April 10 at home, day-and-date with its originally scheduled theatrical release.

 

Having followed the day-and-date landscape for some time, these changes—and the speed with which studios made themare nothing short of jaw-dropping.

 

Outside of the elite Bel Air Circuit—where an invitation-only group of A-listers are allowed to watch cinema content in their personal screening rooms using the same digital files sent to commercial theaters—there has been no way for “normal” people to view content still playing in theaters at home, and studios have maintained a very clear firewall of release windows to ensure that theater owners are given exclusive access to this premium content.

 

Typically, movies play exclusively in the theater for a month or so before going to premium video-on-demand (PVOD) services such as pay-per-view or airlines, then to an online digital release such as via Kaleidescape, Vudu, or iTunes, then a disc release about 14 weeks after the theatrical run, then to home video services like HBO a couple of months later, and then

finally to non-pay TV services. 

 

Universal’s recent moves have taken this model and blown it up.

 

And, here is a bit more perspective on how radical Universal’s decision is to make these films available at the 48-hour PPV viewing window of $19.99. Just a few years ago, Universal was one of the early investors in a high-end home theater startup 

company called Prima Cinema. Prima planned on bringing first-run, day-and-date theatrical content to the home market, but with a slew of restrictions that included an insane amount of anti-piracy measures, a limit on the number of seats in the theater, biometric sensors, and requiring a piece of proprietary hardware installed in a closed system that cost $35,000. Oh, and each viewing cost $500.

 

That is why letting anyone with a Roku, Firestick, or AppleTV watch Trolls day-and-date for $19.99 is utterly gamechanging. (Currently the quality of these titles appears to be limited to HD resolution, not 4K HDR, but this is a rapidly changing landscape and that is subject to change.)

 

After the big Universal domino fell, other studios started adopting a similar strategy.

 

Sony Pictures announced the latest Vin Diesel actioner, Bloodshot, which just hit theaters on March 13, would be 

available for purchase for $19.99 starting March 24. Warner Bros. is releasing the Ben Affleck sports drama, The Way Back, which hit theaters on March 8, for purchase on March 24 as well. And the faith-based music drama, I Still Believe, which Lionsgate released on March 13, will be available on March 27.

 

Then, on March 20th, the next domino dropped—the biggest one so far from Walt Disney Company, which announced that its latest Pixar release, Onward, which just hit theaters on March 8, would be available for purchase starting at 5 p.m. eastern and heading to Disney+ for streaming on April 3. This was a massive release from Pixar, with an estimated budget of $175-200 million, yanked from theaters after less than two weeks and put into the home market.

 

With commercial theaters forced to temporarily shutter their doors, the home market is the only outlet for studios to get these films out there and try to recoup some of the costs. Of course, I’m sure an argument was made for just “freezing” films in the theater as they were, and going back to business-as-usual once theaters reopen. But with film releases often scheduled months or years in advance—and films already stacked up in an uncertain pipeline—sometimes it is a now-or-never proposition to secure a film’s release date.

 

This offers Hollywood an almost guilt-free major-market test of bending or easing the early-release window. With commercial theater owners forced to close and unable to claim this is hurting their profits, the studios can experiment with the market demand and interest in early release and see if there is enough money to be made from going into homes early.

 

What we are seeing now could be an end to theatrical releases as we knew them, or it could just be a temporary anomaly forced by unprecedented events.

 

Either way, we’ll continue covering this news as it develops. Meanwhile, you now have the opportunity to enjoy some fantastic content in your own home far earlier than normal.

John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

Just Mercy

Just Mercy (2019)

Wherever you stand on the controversial topic of capital punishment, it’s probably safe to say that no one wants to get it wrong and accidentally put an innocent person to death. And while we would probably all like to believe the justice system is infallible and that it goes out of its way to get it right and ensure those given the ultimate sentence are truly guilty and deserving, the sad truth is that isn’t the case. Especially in the past. And even more especially in parts of the South.

 

Just Mercy is the true story of an idealistic, fresh-from-Harvard-Law graduate African American, Bryan Stevenson (Michael B. Jordan), who travels to Alabama to open the Equal Justice Initiative with Eva Ansley (Brie Larsen) to seek justice for those wrongfully convicted or who had received inadequate counsel. While visiting the William C. Holman Correctional Facility in Alabama, Stevenson meets with a variety of inmates and listens to one sad story after another about being railroaded by a legal system that seems rigged to work against them.

 

One of these is Walter McMillian (Jamie Foxx), accused, convicted, and sentenced to death in Monroe, Alabama for the 1986 murder of an 18-year-old white girl. After McMillian has spent years on death row, Stevenson takes up his case. (Interestingly, Monroe County is where Harper Lee was born, and the wrongful trial and conviction of Tom Robinson in her novel To Kill a Mockingbird in many ways echoes what happened to McMillian.)

 

As Stevenson starts digging through files and records and court transcripts, it quickly becomes apparent that the case against McMillian was fueled by deep-seated racism and the need to solve the murder, with much of the evidence that would have acquitted him having been excluded, and with the guilty verdict—and the prosecution’s entire case—hinging entirely on the forced and fabricated testimony of a convicted felon, Ralph Myers (Tim Blake Nelson).

 

Beyond the compelling story, what truly drives Just Mercy are the fantastic performances turned in by Jordan, Foxx, and Nelson. Jordan is quickly becoming a favorite actor of mine, after engaging roles in Creed, Black Panther, and Fruitvale Station, and he definitely delivers here, showing off Stevenson’s idealism and hope to change the system and save lives. And we repeatedly experience the shocking injustice at virtually every turn through his eyes and expressions.

 

Foxx is the polar opposite of his normal bombastic and cocky persona, instead being reserved and slow to believe and hope that this time this lawyer will actually be different, but when intensity and emotion are called for, Foxx delivers.

 

Nelson, who has made a career of playing quirky characters (and whose appearance in movies never fails to elicit an, “We thought you was a toad!” quote from my wife and me, recalling his character Delmar O’Donnell in O Brother Where Art Thou?) does a terrific job of inhabiting the conflicted Myers, adopting a tic and speech pattern that represent his abuse growing up in the foster system and bringing some humanity to what initially seems an unredeemable person.

 

The film avoids all of the usual prison-film tropes of guards beating prisoners, yard riots, or shower rapes, and instead focuses on the friendships that develop between prisoners on the Row and the helpless feeling of waiting around in a cage for someone or something else to make a decision that will change or end your life.

 

There is one execution that underscores the high stakes involved should the appeals fail, but even that scene shies away from reveling in anything gruesome, with the camera instead cutting away right before the electricity is applied. However, it retains a high level of emotion as we experience what we can’t see through Stevenson’s eyes and the feelings of the other prisoners along with a low, steady hum of high-current passing off camera.

 

Repeatedly, the film leaves you feeling infuriated by the smug confidence and corruption of the (then) all-white Alabama law machine, specifically Sheriff Tate (Michael Harding) who seems less concerned whether McMillian is the guilty person and more so that someone is going to pay. The justice system appears to circumvent and corrupt justice at every turn, and, like 

McMillian, you end up with a feeling of despair, hopelessness, and anguish. Just how many wrongs can be uncovered and the truth still be denied?

 

Filmed in 8K, Just Mercy is taken from a true 4K digital intermediate, and closeups certainly reveal each pixel of this detail. Facial detail is sharp and in razor focus, showing every pore, pockmark, and whisker. Early on Stevenson wears a V-neck sweater vest, and there is fine-line stitching clearly visible along the neck and shoulders.

 

The film has a mostly reserved color palette throughout. Many exterior scenes feature earth tones under a mostly muted and overcast sky, with even the often bright-blue Alabama skies dialed back. The interior of McMillian’s home is filled with tans, browns, creams, and other muted tones, and the prison interiors are taupes, greys, whites, and beiges.

 

HDR is used to provide punch to shadows and sunlight streaming through windows, but this isn’t really a film that stuns with amazing visuals.

 

Sonically, I’d call the Dolby Atmos soundtrack reserved. Fortunately, dialogue, which is the all-important character here, is well and faithfully presented in the 

A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs

center channel, letting you easily understand every line. They do use some opportunities to provide some ambience in the mix, such as having birds chirp, wind blowing, and leaves rustling in outdoor scenes. The mix also does a nice job of putting you inside the prison, with dialogue mixed in a way to makes you feel like you’re in a low-ceilinged room, with the subtle buzz of lights and hum of the HVAC system. Occasionally, you’ll hears doors slamming or shouts off in the distance. When McMillian is locked in his cell, the door slides shut with a weighty and convincing thunk.

 

Just Mercy is a heavy and powerful 2 hour and 17-minute film that received a well-deserved 99% audience rating on Rotten Tomatoes, and is one that will leave you thinking well after the credits roll. In fact, an end-credit scene leaves you with the staggering statistic that for every nine persons executed in the United States, one is exonerated and set free.

 

The film dropped a week earlier than expected at the Kaleidescape store, nearly a full month before the physical Blu-ray release on April 14. No 4K disc version is announced at this time, making Kaleidescape your best option for the highest-quality viewing experience.

John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs

In “The Lost Art of Souvenir Movie Programs,” Tony-winning director Gerard Alessandrini talked about his efforts to hunt down the promotional programs for classic movies spanning the entire history of film. Here, as promised, is an extensive dive into that unique and diverse collection of movie ephemera.

 

Click on any of the images to enlarge them.

SILENT FILMS

A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs

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MUSICALS

A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs

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EPICS

A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs

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SCI-FI / FANTASY

A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs

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DRAMAS

A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs

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1950s WIDESCREEN

A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs
A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs

click on any of the images to enlarge

. . . and lastly

A Gallery of Souvenir Movie Programs

As promised, Gerard’s copy of the movie program for Star!, signed by both Julie Andrews and director Robert Wise.

Gerard Alessandrini is a Tony Award-winning writer/director of musicals, best known for the long-
running musical satire Forbidden Broadway and the Hamilton spoof Spamilton, both of which
have been performed in theaters around the world. He has been the lyricist (and sometimes
composer) for over a dozen musicals, including Madame X,The Nutcracker & I, Scaramouche,
and the Paul Mazursky musical of Moon Over Parador, and has won numerous accolades,
including two Lucille Lortel awards and seven Drama Desk awards. His voice can be heard in
Disney’s Aladdin (1992) and Pocahontas. He’s also written special-material songs for many
stars, including Angela Lansbury, Carol Burnett, Bob Hope, and Barbra Streisand.

The Lost Art of Souvenir Movie Programs

Collections of film memorabilia are always fun and interesting because posters and paraphernalia are essentially advertisements that are attractive and eye-catching, as well as informative. And because advertising styles change every year, a poster or press book from the 1940s is enormously different from one from the 1990s. But no matter the decade, the tie-in is often a fond reminder of the movie it promotes.

 

I’ve always appreciated movie posters, but there is another type of film memorabilia I’ve enjoyed even more—the souvenir movie program. This is definitely a long-lost art from the past. In fact, it’s not even well known that these even existed.

 

From 1915 to about 1995, many films wanted to be taken seriously as theatrical-type “events.” These films sold elaborate color programs, just 

like the ones sold at theatrical shows and concerts. In the 1960s when reserved-seat road-show engagements were popular, films were marketed like a Broadway show. (Indeed, many of these films were adaptations of Broadway hits.) The film companies would print up hundreds of booklets to be sold at the initial engagements.

 

In the 1960s, they sold for about a dollar each. Often, they were displayed and sold at the concession counter. You felt they were a very special souvenir because they could only be purchased at the movie palace where the film was playing. Nowhere else. When the film went into general distribution to “neighborhood theaters,” the programs could no longer be found.

 

What made these programs important to film lovers at the time was that they were a lovely reminder ergo “souvenir” of the film they just saw, as it might be a very long time before they viewed the film again.

 

In the first part of the 20th Century, there was no video you could buy a few months after the film’s release. It could be many years until a movie would be broadcast on TV. Or if it was a true blockbuster, like Gone with the Wind or The Ten Commandments, the studio would hold it from view or re-issue for seven years until a new generation was born.

 

Likewise, movie posters were never for sale or available to the public since distributors would save the used posters and store them for secondary distribution or future use. Even up to the 1970s, if you wanted a movie poster of a favorite film, you had to steal it. Remember Francois Truffaut’s childhood memory in Day for Night, where he steals the Citizen Kane lobby cards?

So, the only item a film fan might have to remind them of the film was a souvenir program.

 

I first started collecting them in the 1960s. I always brought an extra dollar along with me to a road-show film so I could buy the program to the likes of My Fair Lady, The Sound of Music, or Oliver!. As my collection grew, I realized from research and sometimes inserts in the programs that they had been printing up souvenir programs for many years.

 

In thrift shops and out-of-print book stores, I found the likes of the hardcover Ben-Hur (1959) souvenir book. From the back page, I found the address of the original publishers. (Remember, there was no internet then.) I began writing directly to the 

publishers and found they were more than wiling to sell me older programs for a dollar. I was able to add How the West Was Won and many other of the 1960s epics.

 

As I collected what I could find from the past, I continued to collect newer ones from road-show movies I attended, such as 2001: A Space Odyssey, Sweet Charity, Cabaret, and The Godfather. As the road-show era subsided, so did the production and sale of souvenir programs. However, about that same time in the 1970s, I found out that in Britain the idea of the color program was still popular. The British have a love and knowledge of theatergoing, and understood and enjoyed their value. I was soon sending to London for programs like The Boy Friend and The Battle of Britain.

THERE’S LOTS MORE TO SEE!

Gerard’s collection of movie programs is so extensive that we didn’t even have enough room for all the highlights. So if you’d like to see some more rare treasures—like a look inside the original Singin’ in the Rain program, the industry-only booklet for the original Star Wars film, and even the program for the infamous mega-flop Star!, signed by Julie Andrews and director Robert Wise—check out our image gallery for “The Lost Art of the Souvenir Movie Program.”

Here in America, the rise of the science-fiction blockbuster helped keep the tradition of the souvenir program barely alive. Star Wars had a modest souvenir program for the general public to buy at the candy counter. For the audiences attending the premiere, however, a more spectacular program for the “upper class” movie industry was distributed. The Star Wars special edition was larger, more colorful, and glossier. To acquire a special-edition program like that you had to know somebody in the industry. As a young man that was a challenge!

 

But I think I enjoyed expanding my collection because movie souvenir programs were so hard to find.

 

When I grew up, I would take business trips to Hollywood, where I found various film bookstores like Larry Edmunds where they had large selections of classic Hollywood programs. I began to collect souvenir programs back to the 1920s, such as 

The Lost Art of the Souvenir Movie Program

Noah’s Ark, and even much earlier D.W. Griffith films like Intolerance and Birth of a Nation. Even these were elaborate booklets with many color pages.

 

After the LA earthquake of 1994, a big bookcase fell over at Larry Edmunds’ bookstore, and behind it lay a well-preserved collection of 1930s souvenir programs. They were kind enough to sell me this lost treasure trove, which included an elaborate die-cut program from the Grauman’s Chinese Theater premiere of Walt Disney’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

 

As I added to my collection, I found it easier to locate programs from the 1920s and ’30s than the 1940s and ’50s. But many of my favorite films are from that later era. I wondered, “Were there souvenir programs for The Best Years of Our Lives or An American in Paris?” Through private collectors, I found out. Indeed, there were! The reason for the scarcity of programs from that time was the paper shortage caused by World War II and the subsequent Korean War.

 

After years of searching, I eventually found very rare souvenir programs to Citizen Kane, Sunset Boulevard, and even All About Eve.

 

Since the country was still recuperating from the paper shortage, these are mostly in two-color monotone, but in this way, they match the films. Only the American in Paris and Singin’ in the Rain seem to want for more, although they have a certain two-color charm of their own. What they lack in Technicolor punch they make up with in stylish collage design.

 

As the movies became more spectacular in the 1950s, so did the programs. Hardcover editions for Around the World in 80 Days, Spartacus, and El Cid were created. They are loaded not only with color stills but profuse information about the making of the epics and “backstage” behind-the-scenes pictures.

 

For that reason, they are still helpful and very fun to thumb through today. Sometimes they are even fun to pull out when you’re watching a classic David Lean film like Dr. Zhivago in your high-end home theater.

 

Today you can’t buy a program at a theater’s concession counter. Instead, blockbuster and fantasy films have complete film books that are sold to the public in stores such as Barnes & Noble. They are spectacular and often of the coffee-table variety. But that’s a different kind of film-book collecting.

 

One of the last programs sold in a movie was Dreamgirls (2006). I remember buying a gorgeous oversized program 

for the movie at the Ziegfeld Theater in New York. Even then, I suspected it was not a return to the golden age of souvenir programs but part of the marketing choices to give a 1960s retro feel to the film.

 

Gone is the era of seeing a film and leaving with a little piece of a movie by taking home a souvenir program. But if you search the internet enough you can still find a few. They are a vivid reminder of the golden age of Hollywood hype!

 

Gerard Alessandrini

Gerard Alessandrini is a Tony Award-winning writer/director of musicals, best known for the long-
running musical satire Forbidden Broadway and the Hamilton spoof Spamilton, both of which
have been performed in theaters around the world. He has been the lyricist (and sometimes
composer) for over a dozen musicals, including Madame X,The Nutcracker & I, Scaramouche,
and the Paul Mazursky musical of Moon Over Parador, and has won numerous accolades,
including two Lucille Lortel awards and seven Drama Desk awards. His voice can be heard in
Disney’s Aladdin (1992) and Pocahontas. He’s also written special-material songs for many
stars, including Angela Lansbury, Carol Burnett, Bob Hope, and Barbra Streisand.

The Report

The Report (2019)

Sitting at home during the early stages of what may turn out to be a genuinely spectacular pandemic, I sometimes let my mind drift over recent history, with specific key aspects of select periods pointing to some deeper meaning.

 

Sure, it may be the wine talking, but there are truths that only become apparent when allowed to ruminate without the burden of an overly hectic social schedule. Facts like how 2019 was unlike any other year in that it indeed was the Year of Adam Driver.

 

Think about it: Last year, Driver starred in no fewer than four full-length North American releases: The Dead Don’t Die, Marriage Story, The Rise of Skywalker, and The Report, the last of which came and went in a haze all too fast to garner nearly as much box office success as it deserves.

 

Released in November ’19 a month ahead of the super-hyped wrap to the original Star Wars saga, The Report places Driver in the role of Senate staffer Daniel J. Jones who, in 2009, was enlisted by Senator Dianne Feinstein of California to investigate the ’05 destruction of videotapes documenting allegedly abusive CIA interrogations of prisoners in the months following 9/11. 

 

When the report detailing the findings of the original two-year investigation is brushed aside, Feinstein directs Jones and his team of six to dig deeper, leading them to discover horrible truths that the CIA preferred to remain buried.

 

As a thriller, The Report relentlessly grabs viewers by the collar as we’re taken behind the scenes of the torture program that came to be known for the introduction of the term waterboarding into the American vernacular.

 

Like Three Days of the Condor and other classic thrillers of the ‘70s, The Report builds tension by allowing the story to unfold around a central character, in this case Jones, whose sincerity and near-disbelief at the attempts to thwart his investigation only inspire him to push harder, if not always with the greatest of prudence.

 

Directed by Scott Z. Burns, The Report is a big film with big-ticket stars that remarkably maintains the feel of a lean, independent production. Special effects are replaced by a keen eye on detail, as Jones and his team methodically research the use of “enhanced interrogation techniques,” videos of which went missing shortly before the original investigation kicked into gear. This isn’t some Watergate-style 18-minute gap in audio—hundreds of hours of tapes quickly went MIA thanks to the CIA, or so Jones and his team maintained as the followup investigation built momentum over five years. According to history, the small group dove into more than six million pages of documents, conducted interviews, and met with interference by the Agency and members of the Obama administration, among others. 

 

Unlike thrillers that expand the narrative into the leads’ personal lives, The Report is all about the business at hand. We’re left to surmise that Jones’ home and love lives are anemic at best, as we see him work tirelessly with an added boost of adrenalin every time he or a member of his staff discover a new and potentially beneficial revelation.

 

Playing a man who is consumed by his mission, Driver portrays Jones as supremely buttoned-up, humorless, and wholly wonkish as he dives into a sea of paper in pursuit of the true story. Burns, making his directorial debut, lets the day-to-day details of the story build as the 6,700-page report takes shape. Aside from occasional violence depicted in flashback scenes to the CIA black sites where the abuses took place, The Report is all talk and tension in the best possible way.

 

It is a challenge to present relatively recent news.Yet, Burns and the cast pull it off with what felt like a never-ending race from the windowless box where the team did their research to meetings with administration officials, the CIA, and conversations with anonymous sources. Throughout, Driver maintains a focused, sort of angry composure that had me anticipating an explosion of emotion that never materializes. Instead, he is simply a professional with no intention of letting up, especially as it becomes clear that early suspicions about allegations of torture are in fact true.

 

As a screenwriter, Burns collaborated with co-producer Steven Soderbergh on several films, including Contagion, which unsurprisingly is getting cited in current news stories. He eschews oversized scenes for adherence to the story, acknowledging that the story itself is more powerful than any dramatic flourish can provide. Of course, this means the viewer must keep up with the dialogue, which is mixed clear and upfront, with sound effects and music playing their roles as distant seconds to the words.

 

This is Driver’s sweet spot. His dry yet impassioned delivery comes across as honest and sincere, whereas a lesser actor may have lapsed into a more over-the-top presentation throughout the film. As Sen. Feinstein, Annette Bening becomes the character—from her outward appearance to her mannerisms in public and private, she embodies the senator’s pleasant, no-nonsense manner without it becoming a caricature.

 

Upon its release, The Report came and went without making a dent at the box office, which is a shame, given that you will be hard-pressed to find an equally gripping film with a commitment to historical accuracy that makes it required viewing for fans of historical narratives. The combination of a tight script and first-rate cast makes The Report a home run for Burns, box office losses to the contrary.   

Adam Sohmer

Longtime consumer and professional technology specialist Adam Sohmer is president
and
owner of
Sohmer Associates, LLC, a Brooklyn, NY-based public relations & marketing
communications boutique agency catering to leading audio, video, and wireless brands.
Even longer than his career is his obsession with music and movies, and the gear used to
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