Video Options

The Cineluxe Guide to Media Rooms: Video Options
The Cineluxe Guide to Media Rooms

photo by John Frattasi

Our ongoing series on media rooms has, to this point, focused primarily on audio solutions, and with good reason. When constructing a stereo, surround sound, or Atmos audio system for your entertainment space, you’ve got a wealth of options, from soundbars to in-room speakers and discreet architectural speakers, on to completely (or almost completely) invisible speaker systems.

 

When it comes to video displays, though, the choice seems a little simpler: You either get a big TV or you get a projector, right? Actually, no, it’s not that simple. Once you move beyond media-room setups for smaller spaces like bedrooms or home

offices, where a TV is really the only way to go, you’ll want to weigh the pros and cons of a TV versus a projector. You might even find that the solution is to have both—as it is for our own John Sciacca.

 

That may spark a few questions for the uninitiated—namely “Why?” and “How?”

 

To get to the why, we need to back up to something I said in the first post in this series: We here at Cineluxe consider home cinema to be a shared experience. So, while a 75- or 85- inch TV may be more than sufficient to give two or three people sitting on a couch a panoramic viewing experience if the screen is a mere six or seven feet away, your room may be far too large for that sort of setup. If you’re 10, 12, 15 feet away from your screen, no reasonably-priced TV is going to give you and your family enough screen real estate to create a truly immersive viewing experience. A projector and screen, on the other hand, can. Quite easily.

 

So, why not just go with projection and forget the TV? To answer that, we need to remember that media rooms are also called multi-use spaces. The same room where you gather the whole family together to watch The Last Jedi may also be the room where you watch Last Week Tonight on Sunday evenings. And far be it from me to besmirch John Oliver’s looks, but do you really need to see his face at IMAX proportions? Because we’re talking about a media room and not a dedicated home theater, it should be able 

to accommodate casual watching but be able to transition to a more focused and immersive experience for more serious viewing. And depending on the size of your room, a single display may not give you that kind of flexibility.

 

Having a dual-screen setup means you can match the display to the needs of the moment. But how does it work, exactly? It usually involves a retractable screen that slides down from a hidden compartment housed in the ceiling (or in the floorspace above a room in a multi-story dwelling). Stewart Filmscreen’s Cascade is a great example, although other screen manufacturers offer their own variations on the theme: Evanesce from Elite and the gorgeous Zero-G from Screen Innovations (shown below), just to name two.

The Cineluxe Guide to Media Rooms: Video Options

Mind you, going this route does complicate things a bit, at least in terms of using your system, so you’ll definitely want to add a good control and automation system to your media room budget. This will allow you to drop the projection screen down in front of your TV for movie night at the press of a button (or the uttering of a simple voice command), and still access your source devices with a single remote.

 

And it probably goes without saying that if you’re going through all this trouble to ensure the most spectacular video presentation, you probably don’t want to rely on a soundbar for your audio experience. Instead, you’ll want to spec in all of the speakers and processing necessary for true 5.1 to 9.2.6-channel surround sound, depending on your appetite for aural immersion.

 

So, putting it all together, what would a complete dual-screen media room system look like? Combine a 124-inch SI Zero-G drop-down screen with an 85-inch Sony Z9G Master Series 8K LED TV, and add to that the sound system and sources detailed in our previous post: An Anthem AVM 60 or Lyngdorf MP-50 surround sound processor, driving three GoldenEar Technology Invisa Signature Point Source in-wall speakers, two or four GoldenEar Invisa MPX MultiPolar in-walls, four Stealth Acoustics SLR8G invisible speakers, and two Stealth Acoustics B30G invisible subwoofers. Throw in a Kaleidescape Strato Movie Player and Roku Ultra streaming media player, and you’ve got the makings of an incredible home cinema system that practically disappears when not in use. If you want to take that ethos to the extreme, you could even add a TV lift and projector lift from Future Automation to keep your gear completely hidden when not in use.

 

Tie it all together with a professionally installed home control and automation system like Crestron, Control4, or Savant, and you’ll have the power to transform your unassuming living room into your own private cineplex at the touch of a button.

 

Dennis Burger

Dennis Burger is an avid Star Wars scholar, Tolkien fanatic, and Corvette enthusiast
who somehow also manages to find time for technological passions including high-
end audio, home automation, and video gaming. He lives in the armpit of 
Alabama with
his wife Bethany and their four-legged child Bruno, a 75-pound 
American Staffordshire
Terrier who thinks he’s a Pomeranian.

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