High-End TVs Get Design Friendly–Finally

High-End TVs Get Design Friendly--Finally

LG’s OLED88Z9PUA 88-inch 8K TV

If you’re looking to create a multi-use luxury entertainment space in your home, chances are you’re eyeing a direct-view TV over a projection system. That’s not a given, mind you, since there are still any number of reasons to go with a projector. But these days, TVs are where it’s at, especially in terms of picture quality and value.

Still, you’re right to worry about packing a big monolithic black box in the front of your room, or hanging it on the wall of your immaculately decorated entertainment space. The good news is, TV manufacturers are finally starting to devote as much attention to interior design as they are to industrial design, at least at the higher end of the market. In fact, that’s one of the things that truly differentiates luxury TVs from more budget-oriented models these days.

 

In her latest piece, Adrienne Maxwell does a great job of breaking down the current state of the TV market from a performance perspective. But as she hints toward the end, performance isn’t everything. I recently replaced my old TV—a 65-inch flagship UHD model from one of the top manufacturers—with a mid-priced 75-inch model with Dolby Vision capabilities. (The old one only supported HDR10 high dynamic range.) The 75-incher retails for less than half the price the 65-incher did just three years ago, yet it positively blows its pricier forebear out of the water in terms of contrast, color reproduction, screen uniformity, and practically every other picture consideration that matters.

Turn off the screen and turn on the lights, though, and I start to miss my old TV a little. This new overachiever, for all its performance advantages, just kinda sits there. It’s a big, blah rectangle with four spindly feet protruding from the corners that do nothing to conceal the cables connected to the back of the set.

 

Compare that with the new and upcoming slate of flagship offerings from a number of manufacturers, and you can start to see where the high end is really differentiating itself. With little room left to grow in the picture department, today’s upscale-TV makers are decking out their offerings with all sorts of niceties meant to turn TVs from a design vice into a design virtue.

(sorry about the music)

Here are just some of the ways manufacturers are exploring the new frontiers of TV design:

 

Reframing the TV as Art
Samsung’s “The Frame” solves the problem of TV wall clutter by transforming itself into a legitimate piece of artwork when you turn it off. LG does something similar with its Gallery Mode, which uses your TV to display scenic vistas from around the world, updated for every season of the year, when it’s not in use.

Reshaping the TV Itself
Whether you’re looking for something like LG’s rollable OLED TV introduced at CES, or something more radical like the Micro LED displays that are being teased for future public consumption, odds are good that tomorrow’s luxury TV won’t even look like your typical notion of a TV at all. The rollable model literally shrinks into its combination pedestal/built-in sound system like an upside-down window shade. And Micro LED displays consist of Lego-like modular building blocks that let you build a vibrant screen to fit any space, irrespective of traditional notions about display size classes.

High-End TVs Get Design Friendly--Finally

Rethinking the Pedestal
Instead of the awkward stand you’re used to seeing, display designers are exploring new and varied ways of making sure your TV stands up straight. Take a look at Sony’s A9F Master Series OLED (shown above), for example, which sets itself apart with an innovative origami-style kickstand that makes the display positively captivating to look at from the back and sides. LG’s OLED88Z9PUA (say that three times fast) also takes a new approach to the tired old TV stand by affixing the massive display to the top of a simple, elegant open shelf that sits on the floor instead of on a credenza.

 

Whatever form your next display takes, I honestly believe we’re approaching a time in which near-perfect performance is just taken for granted at any price. And when we get there, manufacturers won’t be able to use geeky specifications like nits and dynamic range and awful “smart TV” interfaces to sell displays anymore. What will define the luxury TV of the future is how it fits into your lifestyle, even when—or especially when—it’s turned off.

Dennis Burger

Dennis Burger is an avid Star Wars scholar, Tolkien fanatic, and Corvette enthusiast
who somehow also manages to find time for technological passions including high-
end audio, home automation, and video gaming. He lives in the armpit of 
Alabama with
his wife Bethany and their four-legged child Bruno, a 75-pound 
American Staffordshire
Terrier who thinks he’s a Pomeranian.

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