A Guide to Luxury Speaker Systems

What is a Luxury Entertainment System?

Once you’ve decided what type of luxury home entertainment system best suits your needs and decided whether you want to go with a TV or a projector and screen, you should next think about what kind of speaker system you’d like to have. In Part Three of Cineluxe Basics, we’ll guide you through some of the options, and some of the things you need to think about when picking out your sound system.

 

This is arguably a more important decision than what type of video display to go with, if only because you’ll probably be living with your new speaker system for way longer. Unlike TVs, projectors, and indeed even electronics—which often become

outdated after a few years due to the rise of new audio/video standards—a good speaker system can perform at its best for decades to come, with no updates needed.

 

That’s not to say that there have been no recent advancements in speaker technology, though. As mentioned in “What is a Luxury Entertainment System?” perhaps the biggest change is that hidden architectural speakers—those designed to be installed in your walls or ceiling and painted to match the environment—now boast levels of performance that were unheard of just a decade ago.

 

Take GoldenEar Technology’s Invisa Signature Point Source speakers, for example. These discrete in-walls deliver much the same performance as the company’s lauded in-room tower speakers, just without the big, black, monolithic design. GoldenEar also makes some very nice, practically invisible in-ceiling speakers, so you could build a nearly complete Atmos surround sound speaker system without ever seeing a single box in the room with you. Other 

companies known for producing high-performance architectural speakers include MartinLogan, Origin Acoustics, PSB, RBH, Triad, and Wisdom Audio.

 

I say “nearly complete” because in addition to five or seven ear-level speakers (depending on your preferences and the geometry of your room) and two, four, or six overhead speakers (if you want to do Atmos and DTS:X), you’ll also need a subwoofer or four. And while most of these bass-makers are big, unsightly boxes, you do have some options for hidden subs, as well.

 

James Loudspeaker makes a diverse line of hidden subs that come in all shapes and sizes, from in-wall options designed for installation in a standard stud bay to larger boxed subwoofers that can be mounted in the attic or in a cabinet, then vented out through a grille that looks like a traditional HVAC vent. Origin Acoustics also offers subwoofers similar to the latter, but with vents that open up into a port that looks virtually identical to can ceiling lights.

 

Chances are good that you’ll want to go with a hidden subwoofer of this sort even if you opt for in-room speakers. Which, by the way, doesn’t mean you’ve completely given up on your décor. These days, any number of luxury speaker manufacturers 

offer models that look right at home in even the chicest of interiors. Focal’s Kanta line, just to name one example, comes in a wide array of finishes running the gamut from Gauloise Blue to Warm Taupe. Simply put, these gorgeous cabinets are as much of a statement as they are a high-performance sound source.

 

If Italian design is more to your liking, check out Sonus Faber’s Homage Tradition collection, a deliciously retro lineup that borrows much of its handcrafted design from 

A Guide to Luxury Speaker Systems

Bang & Olufsen’s Beolab 18 speakers

the art of violin making. Or the company’s newer Sonetto Collection, which draws heavy inspiration from the shape of the lute for its distinctive styling.

 

Depending on your aesthetic taste, you may also find what you’re looking for in the style-focused designs of luxury manufacturers like Steinway Lyngdorf, Meridian, and Bang & Olufsen.

 

No matter how large the room or beautiful the speakers, though, few people would want to have an Atmos system made up of nothing but massive floorstanding models. One common solution is to have tower speakers flanking your TV or projection screen (sometimes accompanied by a matching, wall-mounted center channel speaker) and then employ high-performance architectural speakers for the surround channels.

 

These recommendations shouldn’t be viewed as the last word, by the way—merely a starting point in your exploration of what’s available at the moment in terms of ultimate-performance speakers that will either accentuate or recede into the background of your carefully crafted décor. The point is, you don’t have to sacrifice on style to put together a home cinema sound system that will positively embarrass your local cineplex. 

Dennis Burger

Dennis Burger is an avid Star Wars scholar, Tolkien fanatic, and Corvette enthusiast
who somehow also manages to find time for technological passions including high-
end audio, home automation, and video gaming. He lives in the armpit of 
Alabama with
his wife Bethany and their four-legged child Bruno, a 75-pound 
American Staffordshire
Terrier who thinks he’s a Pomeranian.

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