Home Theater Reborn, Pt. 1

Home Theater Reborn, Pt. 1
Theo's Corner

This series of posts is meant to document the dramatic new direction I took with my career beginning about two years ago. Sensing that the needs for luxury home entertainment were changing, and that a new market was emerging in that area, I began to explore ways to create theaters that can be easily reproduced while still offering the ultimate movie-watching experience at home. I hope you enjoy the story of my efforts to reinvent home theater.

 

 

My life at the moment is consumed with the challenge of figuring out how to engineer all the various elements of a home theater. For years, I have seen how difficult it is to create each new theater design from scratch and to work my way through the process without a consistent structure, guided only by a vague application of aesthetics.

 

Designers and architects usually have a certain vocabulary they can refer to when they are designing a specific space like a dining room, bedroom, or bathroom. And each of those spaces is made up of specific elements that are the tools that they play with.

 

Those elements can be things like furniture, carpets, fabrics, sinks and other fixtures, and so on. These are specific objects, and their practical and aesthetic function within each space is clearly understood. A living room sofa would of course look as absurd in a bathroom as a bathroom sink would look in a dining room.

 

Once the value of the elements within a specific space is understood, designers have no restrictions on applying their imaginations to play with all of those elements so they can reward their clients with the best possible results.

 

It might seem as if designing a home theater would be the same, but it’s not. We do work with specific elements within a theater, and some of them—like chairs, carpeting, lighting fixtures, and fabrics—are similar to what you would find elsewhere in a home. But that similarity only holds true up to a certain point, because each of these things must be treated somewhat differently in a theater room—or in any type of entertainment space.

 

The main difference is that, whereas the use of technology is optional in most other parts of a home, it is essential to a home theater. And that technology creates demands that make it very difficult to use the same elements that designers use elsewhere in the home without understanding their potential impact on the performance of the room. Things such as acoustics and sight lines must be taken into account. This alone makes designing a theater room much more difficult than designing any other room.

Few if any of the elements in these custom-designed theaters could be easily
and economically reproduced to be used in other theater designs.

Oakland & Park Ave theater photos by Phillip Ennis, Palace theater photo by Michael Weschler

For my entire career until recently, I treated each home theater as utterly unique—partly because each room was unique, especially when it came to its dimensions. Bigger rooms create radically different design demands than smaller rooms. Also, the clients may have preferences for things like colors that won’t work at all well in a home theater space, mainly because they would draw attention away from the screen.

 

Each time I approached a new design, I would have to take all of these variables—such as room size and layout, audio/video equipment, furnishings, fixtures, carpeting, and client expectations—into account and then create a new recipe from scratch. But after having done this repeatedly over so many years, I began to wonder if there wasn’t a better way to approach home theater design—one that would be far more efficient but without compromising the final product.

 

So I began to try to figure out whether we, as designers and architects, could codify what it means to design a theater, and if I could come up with a recipe that would deliver more consistent results. Top of my list was to create a way to protect us from the failure that often comes from mixing ingredients without really understanding if the end result will be pleasing.

 

In the next installments of this series, I will describe how I created a more disciplined approach to home theater design that allowed me to not only collaborate with other artists on my designs but to engineer the various elements of a theater so they could be manufactured in a way that allows luxury theaters to be installed in a fraction of the time and cost of my custom designs.

Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is also an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,000 discs. Theo
is the Executive Director of Rayva.

2 Comments
  • Barry Silverstein

    Sounds a little like you’re moving in the direction of the modular theaters of the Scott Carlson days. But, knowing you, I’m sure I’m wrong. Good luck! Barry

    February 4, 2019 at 11:40 am
  • Theo would love to meet up Jan. 2020@CES. You do some wonderful things! Scott

    February 6, 2019 at 8:01 pm