Home Theater Reborn, Pt. 4

Home Theater Reborn, Pt. 4
Theo's Corner

I am in the middle of struggling with the final phase of developing the Rayva home theater designs so they can be easily and affordably manufactured, shipped, and assembled. This phase requires a very strict engineering discipline to ensure that all the elements can be consistently reproduced.

 

I originally started designing the Rayva elements mostly in the way I used to do with custom-designed projects. I designed them, based not on a consistent formula, but on what I wanted the theater to look like. That is a legitimate approach when you’re designing one theater at a time because with enough time, money, and effort, it’s possible to design just about any theater. But if you have 20 theaters on order that need to be custom designed, there will always be unexpected bumps that can stall the process, even if you approach it with a rigid discipline.

I’ve been working non-stop for the past six months to break down in parts all the elements that make up the wall panels described in my last column (and shown below). We are now in the process of doing the same thing for our designers’ artwork that goes on the surface of these panels. The whole thing is like a cutaway view of a complex object. When you slice the thing you’re designing in the middle, you can see the various layers that make up what you normally see as a single object.

 

We are making the effort to figure out how to productize all the design elements so we can guarantee that they can be easily and repeatedly manufactured. We are turning what used to be treated as a custom-produced element into something that can be fabricated, inventoried, and then assembled as easily as an Ikea cabinet.  Each theater and each design consists of many parts that come in a box with an instruction diagram that shows how to put it together.

 

The challenge for me is, how do I dig deeper and deeper into the makeup of an object and turn it into something that looks like what I have in mind, while ensuring it can be engineered to be built as a part?

 

This has been a fascinating process. We brought on board Paul Stary, a brilliant engineer, who thinks about design differently than I do. I tend not to see the details; I see the big picture. And sometimes this can be a limitation. The 

bottom line is that I’m a designer, so I’m drawn into the look of a product. An engineer sees behind that look. But an engineer doesn’t always know what a designer has in mind. So the process of working together—an artist and an engineer—has been fascinating as we seek to find solutions that 

simplify what the product is without compromising its aesthetic principle.

 

I’m intrigued by this tug of war between engineering and aesthetic because I never had to do it before. In designing a custom theater, my team and I would draw up construction documents, give them to the contractor to build from, and we never had real control of construction methods. It is different when you work closely with an engineer. The collaboration creates the opportunity to constantly review the product from the aesthetic, manufacturing, installation, and functionality perspectives. More importantly, the collaboration creates a “recipe” that can be repeated again and again with a guaranteed result.

 

The whole time I’ve been involved in this process I’ve been asking myself, “Why is this so difficult?” It’s difficult because it requires two disciplines—design and engineering. I envy people who are capable of both. If you look back at what Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci did, they were the prime examples of an engineer 

Home Theater Reborn, Pt. 4

One of our wall panels, shown on its mounting rails
and without its fabric covering.

and an artist together in the same person. That is what makes titans or geniuses like that gamechangers. So I just envy what they do, because I’m not an engineer and I need that support.

 

In my next column, I’ll interview my collaborator Paul Stary about the process of engineering the Rayva rooms.

 

Theo Kalomirakis

Theo Kalomirakis is widely considered the father of home theater, with scores of luxury theater
designs to his credit. He is also an avid movie fan, with a collection of over 15,000 discs. Theo
is the Executive Director of Rayva.

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