A Quiet Place, Part II

A Quiet Place, Part II (2021)

John Krasinski has clearly attended the Chris Pratt school of “how to reinvent your acting career after playing a lovable goofball for years.” Best known as the office-nice-guy—and the other half of the Jim-and-Pam dynamic—Jim Halpert from his nine seasons on The Office, Krasinski has left quiet-Jim behind to become more of an action star, playing the roles of a special-forces operator in 13 Hours and  young CIA-operative Jack Ryan in Amazon’s Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan series. Krasinski has also stretched his talents into writing and directing, most notably with the surprise hit A Quiet Place back in

2018, which he wrote, directed and starred in along with his wife, Emily Blunt.

 

After the huge success of A Quiet Place—raking in over $350 million at the box office against a budget of just $22 million—a sequel was all but inevitable, and Krasinski once again returned to bat the writing/directing/acting cycle.

 

While production began in June 2019, the film took the usual pandemic-postponed path before finally making its way to big screens. Originally planned for a March 2020 release, it was pulled when cinemas across the country closed, and then continued to be pushed back. Much like Christopher Nolan and Tenet, Krasinski was fairly insistent that this movie be seen in a theater as a shared experience, and not to be pushed to a streamer or PVOD release.

 

The film ultimately hit theaters on May 28, where it had one 

QUIET PLAC2 AT A GLANCE

This bigger-budget sequel to the 2018 megahit manages to deliver the horror without leaning on the gore. 

 

PICTURE
Shot on 35mm film, some shots look soft and grainy while others are sharp & clear, with HDR lending shadow depth and detail to the many low-light scenes.

 

SOUND     

A terrific Atmos mix filled with directional cues, many of them subtle, and lots of atmospherics.

of the biggest post-pandemic openings before finally coming to the Paramount Plus streaming service and becoming available for digital download via other retailers—including Kaleidescape—on July 12 after a shortened 45-day exclusive theatrical window.

 

While Quiet Place 2 could be viewed on its own without having watched the original—the opening has a bit of setup to understand what is happening—you’d really be doing yourself a disservice by doing so. Not only does the first film give you a lot of context to better understand the characters and events of the second one, it is also a terrifically entertaining movie in its own right. 

 

While the first film begins some 89 days after a sudden and unexplained invasion by a horde of blind, armored alien creatures with hypersensitive hearing and super speed intent on killing every human they encounter, and follows the Abbott family as they learn to survive in near total silence to remain hidden from the creatures, the second one begins at Day One of the invasion. Not only does this provide a bit of exposition for new viewers, it also gives the film a chance to bring Lee Abbott (Krasinski) back for a bit.

 

After the opening, Quiet Place 2 jumps ahead to Day 474 of the invasion, some short time after the events of the first film. The Abbott family of Evelyn (Blunt), hearing-impaired teenage daughter Regan (Millicent Simmonds), and adolescent son Marcus (Noah Jupe) are still living on their farm, caring for the baby born near the end of the first film. After noticing some signal fires on the horizon, the family sets out to try to find a safer place and any survivors, where they meet up with an old family friend, Emmett (Cillian Murphy), who is living in an abandoned steel factory that provides a measure of sonic security from the aliens. 

 

While scrolling through a radio dial looking for any signals, they stumble across a station playing “Beyond the Sea” on repeat. Believing this is a clue to where other survivors are living, Millicent sets off on a quest to find them and see if she can weaponize her cochlear implant by playing the high-frequency feedback it produces through the radio’s transmitter. But not all of the human survivors are good, which adds another element to the danger. 

 

The film’s taut sub-90-minute runtime (excluding end credits) has very little fat and moves along at a brisk clip. Something is always happening to move the story forward, and by splitting the family into three groups, there is always some measure of tension and suspense. And because characters are generally whispering or communicating via American Sign Language, it forces you to pay attention, almost leaning forward in your seat, making you even more susceptible to the films several quality jump-scare moments. 

 

It has been some time since I watched the first film, but I feel like this had more action and excitement, and certainly gives a far better look at the aliens. With a much larger budget, in excess of $55 million, it also feels like a “bigger” film without losing the focus of the first film. Also, while this seemed like the kind of movie that all but screamed for a mid- or end-credits scene to tease a further installment, there isn’t one. 

 

A fair bit of Quiet Place 2 looked a bit soft and grainy to me, which made a lot more sense after I learned that it was shot on actual 35mm film. While the home transfer is taken from a true 4K digital intermediate, it definitely doesn’t have that tack-sharp look of modern digitally-shot productions. Don’t get me wrong, there are plenty of shots—specifically closeups—that have abundant sharpness, clarity, and detail; it’s just that there are also quite a few moments—specifically long shots or scenes with extreme low-lighting—that are soft and a bit grain heavy, and more resemble a good Blu-ray transfer than a true 4K film.

 

Many of the scenes are shot in dark or very low-lit interiors, such as one of the principal locations inside an abandoned steel foundry and often inside an old forge with the door closed. Here HDR gives us nice shadow depth and detail, delivering very natural and realistic image quality. There are also quite a few scenes filmed by firelight (actual fires, candles, or lighters) that benefit from HDR’s wider range. 

 

For a movie with “Quiet” in its title, you might not expect the sound mix to play an important role, but this couldn’t be further from the truth. In fact, both this and the original film have absolutely terrific Dolby Atmos mixes that really help throw you into 

the scenes. Sound is an incredibly vital element to the story, and the mixers take every opportunity to provide directional cues to what is happening, heightening the suspense of the action.

 

There is so much tense silence where little clicks, creaks, and noises inform you what is happening—or when you are thrust into Regan’s silent hearing-space, when she is without her cochlear implant (which plays a significant role in both films), where sound can go almost totally silent.

 

There are tons of little atmospheric sounds throughout that really draw you into the experience. Whether it is birds chirping and wind rustling, the clicking and skittering noises of the creatures moving around and overhead, the tinkling of glass bottles, or the flooding rush of a fire sprinkler, you are frequently immersed in the action.

 

My one sonic nit was that some of Murphy’s dialogue could be a bit difficult to understand. He often speaks with a semi-closed-mouth husky-voices whisper that can make understanding a bit of a challenge.

 

A Quiet Place, Part II is almost like a classic horror film where suspense and what

A Quiet Place, Part II (2021)

you don’t see provides much of the scares, and it is the perfect “scary movie” for people who don’t like what the modern horror genre has become. The violence is mostly bloodless, and not the focus of the film.

 

Not only does it make for a great night at the movies, I think it actually plays better in a well-designed home theater outfitted with an array of Atmos height and surround speakers for the full experience. At home, you aren’t at the mercy of suffering through popcorn chewing, drink slurping, candy rustling, and audience chit-chat that would otherwise break the moment, allowing to really enjoy the ride!

John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing for such publications as Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at @SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

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