8K Tag

Cineluxe Trendsetters: Eric Thies

This is the first in our series of interviews with people who aren’t just part of but who define and drive luxury home entertainment. Each offers their unique, candid insider’s perspective on both current trends and the likely future.

 

Eric Thies is the owner of Los Angeles-based DSI Luxury Technology, one of the most successful integration firms in the country. He’s also a driving force behind both The Guild, an alliance of elite integrators, and the Home Technology Association, which helps guide people to the most qualified companies to address their entertainment and smart-tech needs.

 

A passionate advocate for holding home entertainment to the highest possible standards, Eric has never been shy about expressing his opinions, and in this interview he offers his straightforward take on topics like 8K, home theaters vs. media rooms, art walls, and the deplorable lack of standards in the integration industry.

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The 4 Hottest Trends in Luxury Video

The 4 Hottest Trends in Luxury Video

Samsung’s The Wall Luxury microLED TV

I got a chance to get a bead on the latest trends in luxury video this past week at the annual custom integrators CEDIA Expo in Denver. It was great to see that some of the most intriguing products announced at January’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES) are finally becoming real. 

 

microLED DISPLAYS

Perhaps the most exciting technology on display were large-screen microLED video panels that can come in sizes up to 65 feet diagonal. The images on these screens are incredibly bright, have no loss of black level due to ambient lighting, offer incredible contrast, support a wider color gamut, offer superior off-angle viewing, and handle HDR signals far better than front-projection systems.

 

MicroLED systems use small LED tiles, usually little larger than a brick, that snap into a larger matrix to form the full panel. You can later add more tiles to form an even larger screen, and tiles can be replaced as needed. (Most displays ship with extra tiles that have been matched to ensure color uniformity in the picture and facilitate in-field replacement.)

 

MicroLED panels increase resolution by decreasing the size of the pixel structure, or pitch. Reducing the distance between pixels—as measured from center-of-pixel to center-of-pixel—makes individual pixels invisible at typical seating distances.

Many companies offer panels with pixel pitch of less than 8mm.

 

The downside? This technology is massively expensive. How massive? Samsung’s 146-inch diagonal The Wall Luxury (shown above) will retail for $400,000. Need bigger? Sony has you covered with it’s Crystal LED Display System—previously given the awkward nickname CLEDIS—with a 16 x 9-foot panel (219-inch diagonal) that is full 4K resolution, with 1-million:1 contrast and supports high frame rates up to 120 fps, selling for $877,000. Other manufacturers I spoke with—such as Planar, Barco, and Digital Projection—all offer panels of varying sizes with similar pricing.

 

For the luxury market, this is truly the ultimate solution; but it looks likely microLED will never reach mainstream pricing.

 

 

LARGE-SCREEN PROJECTION

If you want a screen larger than 90 inches for your luxury theater or media room but don’t want to pay the exorbitant prices commanded by microLED displays, front-projection systems remain the best way to go. Due to limitations in light output, projectors often struggle with HDR signals, which are typically mastered for LED displays capable of producing far brighter images. Improving HDR handling is something projector companies continue working on, and both Sony and JVC rolled out new firmware specifically to address how their projectors process HDR images.

 

JVC’s new Frame Adapt HDR analyzes the peak brightness of each frame using a proprietary algorithm and adjusts dynamic range to provide the best possible HDR image. Frame Adapt HDR works with any HDR10 content, meaning all HDR sources—Kaleidescape Strato, Ultra HD Blu-ray players, Apple TV 4K, Xbox One, etc.—can be enjoyed with greater dynamic range and image quality.

 

Barco displayed a very cool projection solution by using a mirror system and its projection-warping technology to place the projector way off center and hidden out of the way—

actually turned sideways in a soffit and firing from the back corner of the room—while still offering a fantastic large-screen image.

 

 

ULTRA-SHORT-THROW PROJECTION

Ultra-short-throw projectors can sit very close to the screen wall—often just inches away—tucked low and out of sight, and can even be completely concealed in cabinetry. Paired with ambient-light-rejecting screens, these projectors produce bright and contrasty images in a typically lit room, meaning they can serve as a TV replacement, giving you 100 to 120 inches of screen that can be enjoyed all the time.

 

Short-throws have typically been priced for the upper end of the market. But at least four companies—LG, Epson, Optoma, and Hisense—now offer 4K laser projectors, usually paired with an appropriate screen and featuring a basic audio system, for under $6,000. This makes them a more attractive option for secondary rooms, like a den or bedroom. 

 

 

8K VIDEO

It seems silly to be talking about 8K video when we aren’t even at a point where broadcast TV—either off-the-air, cable, or satellite—can regularly deliver 4K images, but progress never stops in technology land. Sony, LG, and Samsung all demonstrated 8K displays at the show.

 

Beyond the added pixels—of which there are over 33 million in a 7,680 x 4,320 array—these sets also feature flagship video processing and higher brightness. And it’s these other features that have far more impact on the image than all the extra pixels.

 

Of the sets on display, one of the most impressive was LG’s new 88-inch 8K OLED, which delivered truly lifelike images, with amazing color detail and the ultra-deep black levels for which OLED is known. I’m sure they were feeding the set true 8K images, as they had stunning clarity and depth. At $30,000, this set is truly luxury, but for the viewer who wants the best-of-the-best, this 8K OLED panel won’t fail to impress.

John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

Ep. 8: Who Needs 8K?

The Cineluxe Hour logo

Hosts Michael Gaughn & Dennis Burger open Episode 8 with an apology for the long gap between episodes, caused by a technical glitch.

 

At 4:39, Cineluxe contributor Adrienne Maxwell and Wirecutter senior staff writer Chris Heinonen—arguably the two biggest experts on video displays in the industry—join Dennis & Mike to discuss the emergence of and potential for 8K video.

 

At  26:37, Chris and Dennis discuss Chris’s online 4K viewing-distance calculator, and at 30:32, everybody talks about the movies, series, and books they’ve checked out recently.

CLICK HERE TO CHECK OUT MORE EPISODES OF THE CINELUXE HOUR

RELATED EPISODE

Basic Choices: Projector or TV? Pt. 1

Should You Get a Projector or TV? Pt. 1

When determining the look and design of your new media room or home theater, you’re quickly going to be confronted with a major decision: The size and style of your video display. While the choice ultimately boils down to whether you’ll go with a front projector or a traditional direct-view TV, the number of factors that can go into making that decision can sometimes make it difficult. But you might find it easy to choose if one factor quickly sways your decision, since each technology has definite advantages.

In Part One, I’ll discuss the pros and cons of having a separate projector and screen. In Part Two, I’ll do the same for direct-view TVs.

 

Pros

 

No Limit on Screen Size

While TV screens are measured in inches, projection screens come in feet, and you can get a screen literally as big as your wall can support, meaning you can have a truly cinematic experience in your home. And while people might debate whether they can or can’t see the resolution improvements of 4K on their 65-inch TVs, you’ll be basking in all of the noticeably sharper detail on your 200-inch screen!

 

Less Expensive to Have Bigger Screens

Dollar per inch, it’s tough to beat front projection. Where the price jump from a 75-inch to a 100-inch direct-view set is exponential, it might only be a few hundred dollars more to go from a 110- to a 120-inch screen.

 

Supports Multiple Aspect Ratios

People primarily talk about two different aspect ratios: 16:9 (the rectangular shape of modern HDTVs) and 2.35:1 (the wider shape of many films). But in reality, modern filmmakers often use various aspects to capture a specific look or feel. More and more original content on Netflix and Amazon uses aspect ratios other than 16:9. With a projection screen and a masking system, you can make sure you’re always seeing the image as the director intended, with no distracting black bars.

Optimal Speaker Placement

The ideal speaker layout places the front left, center, and right speakers on the same horizontal plane as the center of the screen, ensuring that the sound exactly tracks the on-screen action. These speakers can be perfectly placed behind an acoustically transparent projection screen, just like in a movie theater.

 

Can Disappear When Not in Use

If you want a movie theater but don’t want your room to look like a movie theater, a front-projection system offers several solutions. Even the largest screens can be motorized to roll up and out of sight, and a projector can be concealed as well, with just a glass porthole in a wall or soffit for the lens to fire through.

 

Still Supports 3D

Direct-view display manufacturers have all abandoned support for 3D over the past few years, but nearly all projectors designed for home use still have this capability.

 

Offers Many Screen Material Options

When you buy a direct-view TV, you get what you get, but when you buy a projection screen, you have a myriad of options. Your installer can help you select the right material, color, and gain to make sure you get the most out of your projector, room, and screen size.

Should You Get a Projector or TV? Pt. 1

Stewart Filmscreen’s Gemini has separate screens for daytime & nighttime viewing

Cons

 

Needs a Dark Room

A projector can’t actually reproduce black, so it projects nothing where black should be. That means, to have black up on screen, the room needs to be black—or at least dark. Since projectors rely on dark rooms to produce their best image quality, that might not be your best choice if there’s any amount of light in your space. Sure, ambient-light-rejecting screens like Screen Innovations’ Black Diamond or Stewart Filmscreen’s Phantom HALR do an admirable job of producing viewable images in lit rooms, but they can’t deliver the same picture quality as viewing in a darkened room.

 

Not Always Good for Gaming
Using a projector can be a con, depending on the types of games you like to play. Many projectors have an input delay of up to several seconds, which means there can be a noticeable lag between when you press a button and something happens on the screen. While this isn’t an issue when pausing a movie, it definitely can be when playing a videogame where milliseconds of reaction time can be the difference between onscreen life and death. Also, if you play games that require standing in front of the screen, you might find yourself blocking the projector’s light path and creating life-sized shadow puppets instead.

 

HDR and Brightness Inferior to TVs

HDR (high dynamic range) can deliver both deep, detailed blacks and ultra-bright colors, but projectors can only deliver a fraction of the necessary brightness levels. This makes HDR on a projection system tricky, with manufacturers searching for the best solution to tone map the high-brightness images for their projectors. Also, outside of a custom, dual Christie Dolby Cinema projection setup, you currently won’t find any projector that can support dynamic HDR metadata like DolbyVision. That isn’t to say projectors can’t pull off HDR, and some of the new laser-based models look pretty spectacular. But direct-view sets will likely always be superior in this regard, able to produce images with more punch and contrast.

 

Lack of 8K Support

I hate to even mention this, but 8K is now apparently a thing, so here we are. Yet no projector manufacturers seem to be seriously pursuing 8K resolution. This is especially surprising since if there was any technology that could benefit from 8K, it would be a massive front-projection screen. (But I digress . . .) I’ve only seen one projector that can deliver 8K resolution, and it was nearly the size of a small car, required its own ventilation system, and cost a wallet-blistering $400,000! (JVC will be launching a native 4K projector that uses the company’s eShift pixel-shifting technology to deliver a pseudo-8K image at a far more reasonable sub-$20,000.)

 

In my next post, I’ll break down the pros and cons of going with a traditional, direct-view TV set for your entertainment room’s display.

John Sciacca

Probably the most experienced writer on custom installation in the industry, John Sciacca is
co-owner of Custom Theater & Audio in Murrells Inlet, South Carolina, & is known for his writing
for such publications as
 Residential Systems and Sound & Vision. Follow him on Twitter at

@SciaccaTweets and at johnsciacca.com.

Specs vs. User Experience

Specs vs. User Experience

Earlier today, I had a sponsored post from Samsung pop up on my Instagram feed. It was for an 80-some-inch 8K QLED display that could be mine for the paltry sum of $15,000.

 

On one hand, $15,000 could be seen as somewhat of a revelation, for it wasn’t too long ago that TVs of this ilk commanded price tags double that of what Samsung is asking. On the other, 4K is in its infancy, and here we are now having to debate over the need—dare I say relevance—of 8K. And yet, despite all my years in this business, the notion that an 80-inch 8K display exists does little to rev my proverbial engine. Samsung’s 8K display does little but make me spec drunk.

 

Many products over the years have made me spec drunk. That is to say, they’ve been beyond impressive on paper. Upon closer inspection or following first-hand experience, they proved no different than much that came before them. Specifications only tell half of a product’s story, and it’s the half that makes for a juicy Internet post, not so much what it’s actually like to live with and use said product.

 

For example, I am a photographer by day, and in that community the camera of the moment belongs to Sony and their A Series of mirrorless cameras. On paper (and on vlogs), the A Series cameras are without equal, and yet I don’t think you could give me one—again.

Yes, I once spent thousands of my own dollars chasing specs and joining the rest of the photographic world in switching from DSLR to mirrorless. I spent almost two years trying to convince myself of Sony’s superiority. I was desperate to fall in love with my camera’s specs and to see that love somehow manifest itself in the work I was creating.

 

Only I didn’t, and it didn’t. I became so frustrated with the user experience that I began to dread picking up the camera. Eventually I sold all my Sony gear and went back to the camera system that had served me well since Day One.

 

Specialty AV is no different, and the constant “noise”

Specs vs. User Experience

that specifications generate can be daunting, if not overwhelming. Moreover, specs are designed to create a sense of FOMO in consumers, for who wouldn’t want eight times more of something? Eight times more TV than the TV you’re likely watching, which was sold to you as being four times the TV of your last TV—and so it goes.

 

And yet, when pressed, my friends in and around this business rarely, if ever, speak fondly of the latest equipment adorning their racks or walls, but rather of equipment of systems past. Is this due to nostalgia? Is it because products of yesteryear were simpler, more straightforward? I don’t pretend to know. What I do know is that the user experience tells a lot more of a product’s story, and it’s the part of the story that resonates long after the newness of a billion more this and a trillion more that wears off.

Andrew Robinson

Andrew Robinson is a photographer and videographer by trade, working on commercial
and branding projects all over the US. He has served as a managing editor and
freelance journalist in the AV space for nearly 20 years, writing technical articles,
product reviews, and guest speaking on behalf of several notable brands at functions
around the world.