art walls Tag

Cineluxe Trendsetters: Tim Sinnaeve

Given all the brilliant art that’s been created using video since the technology was introduced—going on eight decades now since the commercial launch of TV, and five since the appearance of video recorders—and also given the culture’s gluttonous and largely indiscriminate appetite for video content, it was inevitable video art would start showing up on TV and

projection screens.

 

But tossing that art into the same aesthetic shredder with soulless blockbusters, assembly-line sitcoms, echo-chamber news channels, and morons eating chili peppers is to reduce it to the level of bland diversion. So it was just as inevitable that a more discriminating audience, realizing the potential of the latest video displays and sources, would start yearning for gallery-quality art installations at home.

 

Enter Barco, with its reputation for creating ultimate-performance video products—which has led to their projectors being deployed in elaborate, cutting-edge art 

spaces such as the Carrières de Lumières in Provence (shown in “Art Walls: The Next Big Thing?”) and Artechouse in New York City’s Chelsea Market (shown in the video below). So it’s not surprising it’s now being called into service to provide the imaging for the first fully-fledged residential digital-art installations.

 

It is a little surprising, though, to see a tech company doing so much to lead the art-wall charge—thanks in large part to the efforts of Barco Residential managing director Tim Sinnaeve. But Sinnaeve seems to sense that this is an opportunity—

Above are some fragments of Refik Anadol’s Machine Hallucinations captured on a cellphone at NYC’s Artechouse gallery and cobbled together (with apologies to the artist) to provide a sense of the potential and appeal of domestic art-wall installations

poised at the point of intersection of no-compromise video and luxury integration, architecture, and design—to have video displays seen not just as a means of viewing indiscriminate entertainment but to become a more edifying and organic part of the home.

 

In the interview above, Sinnaeve provides a crash-course introduction to art walls, discussing the new tools they provide artists, how they’re becoming

a way for architects and interior designers to not just tolerate but embrace technology, and how we may be at the very beginning of a wave that could completely redefine the meaning of video in the home.

CINELUXE TRENDSETTERS

2019: The Year in Luxury Home Entertainment

2019: The Year in Luxury Home Entertainment

It might not have felt like it, but home entertainment changed in a big way in 2019. And, as Dennis Burger points out in “Beyond Discs & Cinemas,” that monumental shift wasn’t due to any technological breakthroughs or new formats, standards, or must-have devices. The arrival of 8K, which would have represented a major seachange in an earlier era, caused barely a ripple.

 

What happened instead was that the stars aligned—in other words, a variety of existing technologies reached just the right point of maturity to radically change how we experience entertainment. Downloading and streaming, until now maligned as the feeble stepchildren of the moviewatching experience, emerged decisively and undeniably as the future of movies.

 

Check out John Higgins’ post for a recap of this pivotal year in the streaming world. The focus here is more on what it took to achieve a state-of-the-art viewing experience at home in 2019, and how expanding beyond AV has allowed luxury integrators to become far more responsive to how people actually live.

 

Home Theater or Media Room?

Just as downloading and streaming are no longer dismissed out of hand, the once lowly media room has recently made great strides toward respectability—due in part to forces that have little to do with the technology that serves up the entertainment 

experience. And while many had declared the dedicated home theater room dead—or at least in rapid decline—there are signs of a legitimate resurgence.

 

It might seem counter-intuitive to say that both home theaters and media rooms are on the rise. And supporters within each camp will tell you their favored approach is way in the lead. But, in the luxury market at least, it seems to be a dead heat.

 

One big sign of change is that media rooms are becoming commonly referred to as multi-use spaces. “Media room” was a godawful moniker; “multi-use space” really isn’t an improvement, except that it emphasizes the room’s versatility instead of suggesting that it’s a slave to “media” (whatever that means). 

 

Multi-use spaces are nothing new. People have been setting up entertainment systems in rec rooms, dens, family rooms, bedrooms, and elsewhere since the advent of the Victrola. The arrival of TV didn’t do much to change that—and, to be honest, neither did the arrival of home theater.

 

It took the emergence of non-AV domestic automation like sophisticated and responsive lighting and shade control to make multi-use spaces a viable alternative. And 2019 was the year automated lights and shades became pervasive and flexible enough to help turn non-dedicated spaces into legitimate viewing (and listening) environments.

 

To give the AV world its due, the arrival of more designer-friendly acoustical treatments and, especially, the emergence of ultra-customizable, professionally-deployed digital room correction also had a lot to do with putting high-performance multi-use rooms on the map. So did super-sized flat-panel TVs, which can provide a brighter (and some would say better) image than a traditional front-projection setup.

 

But let’s step back a second. While multi-use spaces might be on the verge of offering the performance of a dedicated home theater, do you really want to be blasting out the Endgame finale at reference volume in the middle of your home at 1 in the morning? And do you really want various family members wandering through the room while you’re absorbed in an episode of The Crown?

 

For as good as multi-use spaces have become, they still can’t provide the uninterrupted focus on the viewing experience that a home theater can. And, even though they’re on the cusp, it’s still going to be a few more years before a multi-use room can compete performance-wise with the best dedicated theaters.

 

Ironically, we can thank the tremendous improvements in streamed audio and video for the home theater’s rebirth. People who know little or nothing of LaserDiscs or DVDs are beginning to realize that downloads and streams are rivaling or surpassing what they can experience at even the best movie theaters, and they want rooms that can take full advantage of what internet delivery has to offer.

 

Also, no matter how cleverly a multi-use space is designed, it still clearly signals that it serves more than one master. To have the ultimate entertainment experience, and to create a space that strikingly and unambiguously expresses the value of that experience, you have to have a dedicated room.

 

The Art Wall Revolution

I don’t expect many—or any—of you to buy into what I’m about to say, but please suspend your disbelief for a moment and allow that video art walls (a description as ungainly as “media rooms” or “multi-use spaces”) will eventually have a bigger impact on luxury home entertainment than multi-use spaces and home theaters combined.

 

Here’s why. Architects and interior designers have traditionally held their noses throughout the process of designing, building, and installing entertainment rooms—and for good reason. As much as AV companies might like to think their products are designer-friendly, the truth is that almost everything they put out has all the visual appeal of a WalMart boombox.

 

And creating entertainment rooms means having to deal with tech—a lot of it. AV enthusiasts would have you believe that gear has gotten more user-friendly—it hasn’t. It’s just found new and more intricate ways to be cumbersome and unpleasant. And interior designers have a longstanding, and not unearned, reputation for being technophobes.

 

Also, every home theater or multi-use space is essentially a unique machine. The greater the demands made on it, the more complicated that machine 

becomes. And unless you’re working with an integrator who’s something of a mechanical genius, you’re likely in for a decent amount of trial and error before your room is finally up on its feet.

 

Lastly, it’s hard to put a unique visual stamp on a home theater and especially on a multi-use space. Feeding generic content into your home in mostly generic ways tends to drain any meaningful personal touch from the environment—one reason why entertainment rooms tend to fall into disuse over time.

Video walls, on the other hand, are an opportunity to showcase unique, curated works of art via installations that can be seamlessly integrated into the decor (and structure) of a home. Interior designers love that idea; so do architects. And homeowners will too once they realize they can use these stunning installations to display something other than the usual mind-numbing mass entertainment.

 

This isn’t the place to provide more than just a glimpse of this emerging phenomenon, but it’s worth keeping an eye on—partly because, unlike entertainment-based tech, it’s a harmonious and complementary instead of disruptive and somewhat arbitrary experience. And no matter how they evolve, art walls will always remain a luxury affair.

 

Today & Tomorrow

With 4K HDR content and displays arriving solidly in the middle market, 2019 was also the year reference-quality playback made its way to the masses. Ironically, it was also the year luxury integration decisively separated itself from the world of trunk slammers, geek squads, and other purveyors of “good enough.”

 

Expect 2020 to be the year when professional-grade digital cinema systems, offering picture and sound exceeding the world’s best movie theaters, make serious inroads in luxury entertainment spaces. Expect to see 8K used not so much to create higher-resolution content as to significantly improve the quality of existing content. And expect to see interior design finally welcomed into entertainment spaces—and designers finally willing to accept the invitation.

—Michael Gaughn

Michael Gaughn—The Absolute Sound, The Perfect Vision, Wideband, Stereo Review,
Sound & Vision, The Rayva Roundtablemarketing, product design, some theater designs,
couple TV shows, some commercials, and now this.

CINELUXE TRENDSETTERS

the most influential people in luxury
home entertainment on 
the trends
that defined 2019

Sam Cavitt, Paradise Theater
on how home theaters are better than movie theaters
and the importance of 
dedicated theater rooms

Ed Gilmore, Gilmore’s Sound Advice
on tunable lighting
, voice control, apps vs. control
systems, 8K, and art walls

Al Patel & Cortney Combs, Enhanced Home
on 
media rooms, outdoor entertainment systems,
designer-friendly tech, 8K, and art walls

Cory Reistad, SAV Digital Environments
on 
media rooms, bulletproof installation, downloading
vs. streaming, and automated lighting

Tim Sinnaeve, Barco Residential
on the emergence of video art walls, and their influence on
artists, integrators, architects, and interior designers

Katherine Spiller, Steinway Lyngdorf
on 
designer-friendly tech, luxury audio systems, room correction, digital cinema, and no-compromise media rooms

Eric Thies, DSI Luxury Technology
on 
the return of home theaters, 8K, art walls, and the
sad lack of integration standards

ALSO ON CINELUXE

How to Listen: Just a Little Lovin'
The Mandalorian: More Than Just Star Wars
Every Room Deserves Great Acoustics

Cineluxe Trendsetters: Eric Thies

This is the first in our series of interviews with people who aren’t just part of but who define and drive luxury home entertainment. Each offers their unique, candid insider’s perspective on both current trends and the likely future.

 

Eric Thies is the owner of Los Angeles-based DSI Luxury Technology, one of the most successful integration firms in the country. He’s also a driving force behind both The Guild, an alliance of elite integrators, and the Home Technology Association, which helps guide people to the most qualified companies to address their entertainment and smart-tech needs.

 

A passionate advocate for holding home entertainment to the highest possible standards, Eric has never been shy about expressing his opinions, and in this interview he offers his straightforward take on topics like 8K, home theaters vs. media rooms, art walls, and the deplorable lack of standards in the integration industry.

RELATED POSTS

Art Walls: The Next Big Thing?

Art Walls: The Next Big Thing?

Refik Anadol’s data sculpture Melting Memories

This all started as a side conversation with Cory Reistad, the head of SAV Digital Environments in Bozeman, Montana. We were discussing emerging trends in luxury home entertainment, and Cory mentioned that his company is getting an increasing number of requests for video-wall installations so people can display unique, commissioned works of video art

in their homes.

 

Intrigued, I reached out to a number of people I trust to know a lot more about something like this than I do. Some of them were well aware of, and up to speed on, the whole “art wall” thing and excited about the possibilities. Some of them had no idea what I was talking about. That suggested that this is a bona fide trend that hasn’t yet achieved broad awareness even among the luxury-tech cognoscenti.

 

What follows can’t really be called an introduction to art walls—it’s more like some random notes pointing in their general direction. But I wanted to send out an early missive as I do my due diligence and we, as a site, begin to wrap our arms around the phenomenon.

 

It would probably be a good idea to show you what I’m talking about. A bunch of website loops and Vimeo clips obviously can’t begin to convey the impact of these installations, but they can at least give you a taste of what they’re all about.

First up, a projector-driven installation Barco did at the the Carrières de Lumières, a quarry-based exhibition space in Provence, France. (Early evidence suggests Barco has been largely responsible for defining, promoting, and facilitating the art-wall category—but we’ll circle back to all that in later posts.)

Art Walls: The Next Big Thing?

Next, two works by Refik Anadol. I was steered to these by Barco Residential managing director Tim Sinnaeve, who has been tremendously generous and patient about addressing my ignorant queries and bringing me up to speed. The first is Melting Memories, a 20 x 16.7-foot LED video wall of “data sculptures” based on brain-wave activity associated with memory:

The second is “Wind of Boston,” a series of video paintings that feed off from a one-year set of meteorological data gleaned from Logan Airport:

Art walls seem to be catching on for a number of reasons. Projectors are brighter, projection screens are better at rejecting ambient light, and technology like MicroLED is taking hold that will allow you to create practically any size screen out of flat-panel video displays. Also, people are finally starting to think of video screens less as eyesores and more as design opportunities. Third—although this might just be wishful thinking on my part—the proliferation of content via streaming might be creating genre burnout, causing people to reject cookie-cutter mass-market diversions for more meaningful work. Or maybe they’re just taking video works more seriously as art.

 

Tim Sinnaeve discourages using the phrase “art wall,” by the way, in favor of “Architectural Digital Canvas,” while referring to the content itself as “New Media Art.” I can see the need for the more accurate nomenclature—there’s no reason, for instance, why you can’t have video images on the ceiling or the floor as well as the wall—but “art wall” seems like the more intuitive term, at least as we begin to explore the trend.

 

Tim pointed out something that was kind of an epiphany for me, since it suggests that these installations are part of a larger paradigm shift in luxury tech. Art walls deliberately try to avoid the connotations of the 16:9 aspect ratio, which we associate with computer monitors, movies, TV shows, and gaming, so the viewer will more readily embrace the art work on its own terms. The idea of freeing screens from the tyranny of the proscenium could clear the way for other innovative tech-driven art/entertainment experiences in the home, again, helping to break the stranglehold of mass-produced genre-driven melodrama. It could also finally provide a way for architects and designers, who tend to look askance at the man cave and its descendants, to embrace cutting-edge video tech in the home.

 

Like I said—just a bunch of random notes as we begin to look into a development well worth checking out.

Michael Gaughn

Michael Gaughn—The Absolute Sound, The Perfect Vision, Wideband, Stereo Review,
Sound & Vision, The Rayva Roundtablemarketing, product design, some theater designs,
couple TV shows, some commercials, and now this.