Bowers & Wilkins Formation Duo Tag

The Religion Surrounding AV Gear

The Religion Surrounding AV Gear

It all started with a Sony OLED 4K/UltraHD display, one with Sony’s own AcousticSurface tech. That display, despite being visually brilliant, also was among the first that sounded audibly brilliant, all things considered. Was it as good an aural experience as having discrete loudspeakers? No, but it did rival the performance of most of today’s mainstream soundbars. The display was important to me in my evolution as an enthusiast because, for the first time, a display—a single piece of tech—served as an all-in-one home entertainment solution.

 

All-in-one solutions are nothing new to specialty AV or hi-fi. Many would likely argue that integrated amplifiers are all-inclusive. While I would largely agree, integrated amps still require the end user to have speakers, source components (in most cases), and a display, whereas the Sony required, well, a power cord. The 75-inch display—which is plenty big for an immersive

home theater experience by the way—was all that was required in order to enjoy my favorite films, new and old, via streaming. Oh, and it was “smart,” meaning anyone with vocal cords could operate it to its fullest potential.

 

I cannot stress what an eye-opening experience living with that particular display was. As good as its sound was on its own, I knew there was room for it to improve through the use of third-party speakers. Enter the Bowers & Wilkins Formation Duo. Not wanting to turn this into a Formation Duo review, what you need to know is this: These are lifestyle, powered speakers designed to work within Bowers & Wilkins’ own ecosystem, but are also compatible with the latest variations of AirPlay and Bluetooth.

While most displays have Bluetooth capability, and can be paired with Bluetooth-enabled speakers, the Sony’s Bluetooth controls allow for finer adjustments typically reserved for AV receivers and processors. It’s because of this that I was able to enjoy a truly seamless sound experience between the Sony and the Formation Duo. No delays. No hiccups. Just quality sound sans any and all cabling apart from power cables.

 

It was jaw-dropping, partially because it sounded brilliant but also because the whole setup experience was largely automated. The biggest decision I had to make was where to set the speakers themselves. This ease of use, lack of

clutter, and resulting fantastic performance was so impactful that my wife even noticed. Some months later, and this setup remains a staple in our home, and one she comments on daily.

 

Unfortunately, enthusiasts online are less enthusiastic about this setup and its implications—proving, once again, that despite all of our technological advances, we worship at the altar of gear rather than absolute performance. And that’s the truth, for I would put the Formation Duo/

The Religion Surrounding AV Gear

Bowers & Wilkins’ Formation Duo speakers

Sony combo up against any similarly priced setup and then some, and am willing to bet that most folks would actually prefer the sound of the Duos over traditional speakers, so long as they didn’t know what products they were listening to.

 

And that is the larger issue—one I know I’ve raised in other articles on this site—that as interest in specialty AV dwindles, are the hobby’s own supporters to blame? Because wireless and powered tech is being designed at a breakneck pace to give future generations products that they themselves feel comfortable with, and that speak to them. Problem is, these same products, like the Formation Duos, need current enthusiasts to adopt them as well, which isn’t happening. Powered, wireless, or smart products aren’t bad, or incapable of terrific performance; they’re just fighting against nearly 50 years of “tradition”, tradition that has become borderline religion for some. And it would seem that cutting ties with cables and excess equipment for many is akin to cutting ties with the Almighty Himself.

Andrew Robinson

Andrew Robinson is a photographer and videographer by trade, working on commercial
and branding projects all over the US. He has served as a managing editor and
freelance journalist in the AV space for nearly 20 years, writing technical articles,
product reviews, and guest speaking on behalf of several notable brands at functions
around the world.

Will Enthusiasts Ever Learn to Love Smart Tech?

Yesterday, I posted a video on my YouTube channel discussing the smart speaker revolution, and why they and other powered smart devices are the absolute future of specialty AV. I knew this stance was going to be “controversial,” for if there is one thing enthusiasts love, it’s their equipment. In truth, promise an enthusiast an ounce of style and/or convenience and you’re bound to get a stern talkin’ to. Much in the way our grandparents always had to walk up hill in the snow in

order to get to school or work, audiophile and home theater enthusiasts believe giant amps, countless wires, and complicated subroutines are simply what’s necessary in order to achieve, well, something.

 

If you’re triggered by the thought of your precious amplifier, preamp, DAC, or even display having to grow up and work for its supper in 2019, then I would encourage you to stop reading, for what I’m going to say next is bound to put you in the fetal position. You’ve been warned.

 

Wires are stupid.

 

It’s 2019, people. We have self-driving cars. We have super computers in our pockets and augmented reality that can virtually drop us or an object anywhere we want in an instant. Yet there are those among us who believe an argument over Class AB

Will Enthusiasts Ever Learn to Love Smart Tech?

Bowers & Wilkins’ Formation Duo (above) and Bass (below) smart speakers

Will Enthusiasts Ever Learn to Love Smart Tech?

versus Class D amps is relevant. When did home theater—a hobby supposedly made up of technology enthusiasts—turn into The Antiques Roadshow?

 

Case in point, in my video I talked about a month-long experiment I’m trying whereby I’m going to only enjoy my music and movies via some form of wireless connection and/or connectivity to see if it’s possible. This means my display, a 75-inch Sony X950G UltraHD TV, is serving as the primary hub for a 2.1-channel entertainment system. My speakers—Bowers & Wilkins’ new Formation Duo and Formation Bass—are “connected” to the Sony via a Bluetooth connection.

 

In other words, I’m forgoing a receiver or processor, power amp, and all necessary cables needed between them. I am a vinyl enthusiast, so not wanting to go without my beloved records, I opted for a turntable with Bluetooth capability as well. Total number of cables . . . four. Total number of devices to enjoy said entertainment . . . four. Four down from nine. Had I gone with Bowers & Wilkins’ Formation soundbar, we’d be talking about three components total!

 

A day into the experiment, and already I’m feeling like going back to the “old” way of doing things is going to be difficult. It likely will be as difficult for me to give up as it is

proving to be for my audience to accept. For the mere thought of not being able to pontificate about the pros and cons of buying a new amplifier or processor is proving too much for some. Nevertheless, what I’m describing is without question the future of everything AV, which begs the question: Are the enthusiasts currently charged with this industry’s survival going to be the ones who ultimately kill it when they prove incapable of embracing change?

Andrew Robinson

Andrew Robinson is a photographer and videographer by trade, working on commercial
and branding projects all over the US. He has served as a managing editor and
freelance journalist in the AV space for nearly 20 years, writing technical articles,
product reviews, and guest speaking on behalf of several notable brands at functions
around the world.