music videos Tag

3 Must-See Music-Based Videos

3 Must-See Music-Based Videos

Across the Universe

There is no shortage of things to watch these days, but sometimes it’s hard to figure out where the good stuff is hiding—especially when it comes to music-related programming. There are often things that look cool but fall flat in other areas, particularly with the actual performances. Some programs sound great but have lesser production values that become obvious when viewed on a quality home theater or media room system. 

 

Here are three music-centric presentations that offer dynamic visuals, impressive—even game-changing—performances, and compelling, often immersive, surround sound experiences. (All three are available on Blu-ray and for download from Kaleidescape. Across the Universe is also widely available for streaming.)

 

 

Pat Metheny: The Orchestrion Project—Stunning Visuals, Magical Music

Whether you like Pat Metheny’s music or not, watching this live-in-the-studio end-of-tour video featuring his Orchestrion project, is a mesmerizing demo-worthy view. Not sure what an Orchestrion is? Well, perhaps an excerpt from my earlier review of this performance on Blu-ray will help paint a picture:

 

Have you ever been to one of those “Pizza ‘n Pipes” type restaurants? You know, one of those places where they rip apart an old-time movie theater pipe organ and then set it up in a pizza parlor, placing all the inner workings and 

accompaniment instruments (like percussion ‘n bells ‘n stuff) all around the restaurant for all to see and watch while the organist plays. It is really quite entertaining and mesmerizing if you can find one that is still open.

 

So that is effectively what we have here in a 21st 

Century manner—a computer-propelled, guitar-user-controlled orchestra all performing compositions Metheny wrote specifically for this project. The results are spectacular! 

 

I have this performance on Blu-ray and it looks terrific in 1080p, with remarkably crisp definition on all the multitude of instruments in the dynamically lit loft studio space. The lossless Dolby TrueHD surround mix (up to 7.1 channels) delivers a very immersive experience, but even in stereo the sound is rich, engaging, and almost three-dimensional.    Kaleidescape

 

 

Across the Universe—Demo-Worthy Beatles Bliss

Beatles fans tend to be divided about this film, but I have much love for it. It is one of the rare instances where Beatles music has been reinterpreted well, in a compelling new way while still respecting the underlying song.

 

All in all, Across the Universe has a great deal of entertainment depth to it. It can be viewed on its own, with a strong storyline and extremely high production values. As a musical, it works very well too, bringing new meaning/interpretation to the Beatles’ music in the context of the storyline. And if you are a Beatles fan and of ‘60s counterculture, with its iconic stars like Janis Joplin, Tina Turner, and Jimi Hendrix, you’ll no doubt catch the references. There are all sorts of neat little Easter egg-type moments peppered throughout. (For example, all the characters are named after people mentioned in actual Beatles songs.)

 

I love how Joe Cocker plays three completely different characters during the “Come Together” scene (a bum, a hippie, and a pimp!). Be on the lookout for a re-creation/representation of Janis’s psychedelic painted Porsche on the streets of New York in

one scene. There are many references like this throughout the film.

 

Across the Universe is a rich viewing experience with an immersive soundtrack that starts out subtly and builds in intensity as the plot-line thickens. For example, listen how the room ambience changes in the opening scenes during the relatively simple early

Beatles rocker “Hold Me Tight,” which shifts perspective between parallel lives of key characters who have yet to meet. One is shot in a bright wood-floored American dance-hall auditorium while the other is in a murky, claustrophobic stone basement club in England. I’m pretty sure that latter scene was shot in the current version of Liverpool’s Cavern Club (a nightspot where the Beatles initially built up their following). It’s all the more impressive how the music stays in sync between what sounds like two different bands performing (although I suspect it is probably just the different mixes that create that aural illusion).

 

By the end of the film, scenes such as “Strawberry Fields Forever” and “I Want You (She’s So Heavy)” have sometimes intensely immersive surround mixes supporting the spectacular psychedelic-dramatic visuals. These could become demo-worthy audio-visual experiences for some of you!

 

I’ll leave you with some advice pulled from one of John Lennon’s early solo singles: “Play Loud”!  This movie sounds great when you pump up the volume, so don’t hold back. If you want to read more about Across the Universe, click here and here to get to one of my earlier reviews related to it.    Amazon / Google / iTunes / Kaleidescape / Vudu / YouTube

 

 

Jimi Hendrix: Live At Woodstock—Legendary Rock History

In the annals of rock and roll, there are a handful of seminal concert performances everyone needs to experience at some point. Near the top of that list are the ones by Jimi Hendrix. 

 

This recently updated version of his appearance at the Woodstock festival in 1969 is particularly important because new footage materialized that fleshes out the performance, in which portions were missing. (Camera people ran out of film stock and were switching reels.) At some points, you can see angles the official cameras missed, especially closeups on Hendrix’

guitar playing. The new footage was shot unofficially by a 22-year old student from Bard College who brazenly walked up on stage with primitive video gear he had access to. He timed his ascent to the stage carefully so he would be seen as part of Hendrix’ and the filmmaking entourage, allowing him to openly set up his gear and record the performance! 

 

In this footage, segments of the performance missed 

3 Must-See Music-Based Videos

by the actual film crew were captured and 30 years later were shared with the Hendrix Estate for the sake of historical preservation. So while there are inevitable technical imperfections visually—this new footage is low-res, early black & white video—to be able to effectively see the full performance for the first time is a wonderful thing indeed! All things considered, it looks remarkable, benefitting greatly from the delayed beginning of Hendrix’ set during the daytime on the final day of the festival. If he had gone on at night, the footage would not be so compelling.

 

Original engineer/producer Eddie Kramer mixed the whole concert into 5.1 surround sound so now you can enjoy a quite fabulous immersion into the feel of what it might have been like standing near the stage during Hendrix’s legendary performance. It’s not exactly “demo worthy,” but musically and historically, Hendrix at Woodstock is essential viewing and listening.

 

After this, go back and watch Hendrix’ performances at the Monterey Pop Festival in 1967—his game-changing career breakthrough in the U.S.—and at the Berkeley Community Center (recordings that ended up on the great posthumous album Hendrix in the West).    Kaleidescape

Mark Smotroff

Mark Smotroff breathes music 24/7. His collection includes some 10,000 LPs, thousands of
CDs & downloads, and many hundreds of Blu-ray and DVD Audio discs. Professionally, Mark has
provided Marketing Communications services to the likes of DTS, Sony, Sega, Sharp, and AT&T.
He is also a musician, songwriter & producer, and has written about music professionally for
publications including Mix, Sound+Vision, and AudiophileReview. When does he sleep?