Samsung The Frame Tag

Techorating–It’s a Thing

Techorating--It's a Thing

Samsung’s “The Frame” TV 

How long have you dealt with that stack of black boxes perched somewhere within the vicinity of your TV or those strands of spaghetti snaking across the floor to connect this widget to that widget? Maybe you’ve been living in this high-tech state of disarray so long that you’ve started to turn a blind eye toward these and other eyesores.

 

It’s time to stop and do something about it. Your house doesn’t have to look this way. Stereo equipment shouldn’t clash with the cool paint colors on the walls and wiring shouldn’t crinkle up the carpet. Really, there’s no reason that any type of

technology should overpower the cosmetics of any room of your house.

 

In fact, when infused appropriately into the design of your home, things like speakers, cable boxes, security cameras, and remote controls can actually make your house look better than it ever has . . . and make it perform a lot better to boot.

 

How?

 

The secret behind maintaining a clean, uncluttered appearance inside a home occupied by technology is teamwork. Don’t worry—this type of teamwork requires no uncomfortable hugs, handholding, or pep talks. In a home where the goal is to have design and technology work in harmony, you’ll need the teamwork of two very important home improvement professionals: An interior designer and a home technology specialist

 

These two people may seem like an unlikely duo, but when they come together amazing things can happen. Naturally, 

the interior designer’s objective is to turn your house into to an aesthetic masterpiece by applying new textures, colors, and furnishings and revamping architectural elements. Meanwhile, a tech specialist wants to improve the way your home performs through the installation of high-caliber music and video systems, smart lighting and climate controls, and convenient, effortless automation features.

When these two goals are tackled independently, you might sacrifice design for technology or vice versa. But when the tech and design professionals devise and execute a plan together, you get the best of both worlds. That stack of black boxes standing next to the TV disappears, residing instead inside a specially built equipment closet. The TV? With teamwork, the screen can sink into beautifully crafted cabinetry that matches the rest of the woodwork. And cabling? Even speakers can be rendered virtually invisible by recessing them into the ceiling

(or anywhere else for that matter) and coating them with a shade of paint to match the mounting surface.

 

Some of the super-cool setups that happen when an interior designer and tech specialist come together for the common good of your home:

 

Elegant light switches: Faceplates in every color of the rainbow, even gold- and silver-plated, can complement the decorating scheme of a room and consolidate multiple switches under a single housing.

Seura’s TV Mirror 

Artsy TV screens: When the TV is on, you see video; when it’s off, the screen transforms into a work of art or even a mirror.

 

Hidden assets: Motorized lifts can tuck a video projector and screen into the ceiling when they’re not being used. In an instant, a home theater is able to convert back into a traditional family room. 

 

Bottom line: If you’re in the market for either a cosmetic or tech upgrade for your home, be sure to get both contractors on board from the get-go. They’ll be able to come up with a game plan that suits your needs for great-sounding music, jaw-dropping video, elegant lighting, and other smart-home amenities . . . as well as a beautiful, comfortable interior.

 

Lisa Montgomery

With more than 20 years under her belt covering all things electronic for the home, Lisa
Montgomery 
has developed a knack for knowing what types of products and systems
make sense for homeowners looking to update their abodes. When she’s not exploring
innovative ways to introduce technology into homes, Lisa breaks away from the electronics
world on a bike, kayak, or a towel on the beach.

High-End TVs Get Design Friendly–Finally

High-End TVs Get Design Friendly--Finally

LG’s OLED88Z9PUA 88-inch 8K TV

If you’re looking to create a multi-use luxury entertainment space in your home, chances are you’re eyeing a direct-view TV over a projection system. That’s not a given, mind you, since there are still any number of reasons to go with a projector. But these days, TVs are where it’s at, especially in terms of picture quality and value.

Still, you’re right to worry about packing a big monolithic black box in the front of your room, or hanging it on the wall of your immaculately decorated entertainment space. The good news is, TV manufacturers are finally starting to devote as much attention to interior design as they are to industrial design, at least at the higher end of the market. In fact, that’s one of the things that truly differentiates luxury TVs from more budget-oriented models these days.

 

In her latest piece, Adrienne Maxwell does a great job of breaking down the current state of the TV market from a performance perspective. But as she hints toward the end, performance isn’t everything. I recently replaced my old TV—a 65-inch flagship UHD model from one of the top manufacturers—with a mid-priced 75-inch model with Dolby Vision capabilities. (The old one only supported HDR10 high dynamic range.) The 75-incher retails for less than half the price the 65-incher did just three years ago, yet it positively blows its pricier forebear out of the water in terms of contrast, color reproduction, screen uniformity, and practically every other picture consideration that matters.

Turn off the screen and turn on the lights, though, and I start to miss my old TV a little. This new overachiever, for all its performance advantages, just kinda sits there. It’s a big, blah rectangle with four spindly feet protruding from the corners that do nothing to conceal the cables connected to the back of the set.

 

Compare that with the new and upcoming slate of flagship offerings from a number of manufacturers, and you can start to see where the high end is really differentiating itself. With little room left to grow in the picture department, today’s upscale-TV makers are decking out their offerings with all sorts of niceties meant to turn TVs from a design vice into a design virtue.

(sorry about the music)

Here are just some of the ways manufacturers are exploring the new frontiers of TV design:

 

Reframing the TV as Art
Samsung’s “The Frame” solves the problem of TV wall clutter by transforming itself into a legitimate piece of artwork when you turn it off. LG does something similar with its Gallery Mode, which uses your TV to display scenic vistas from around the world, updated for every season of the year, when it’s not in use.

Reshaping the TV Itself
Whether you’re looking for something like LG’s rollable OLED TV introduced at CES, or something more radical like the Micro LED displays that are being teased for future public consumption, odds are good that tomorrow’s luxury TV won’t even look like your typical notion of a TV at all. The rollable model literally shrinks into its combination pedestal/built-in sound system like an upside-down window shade. And Micro LED displays consist of Lego-like modular building blocks that let you build a vibrant screen to fit any space, irrespective of traditional notions about display size classes.

High-End TVs Get Design Friendly--Finally

Rethinking the Pedestal
Instead of the awkward stand you’re used to seeing, display designers are exploring new and varied ways of making sure your TV stands up straight. Take a look at Sony’s A9F Master Series OLED (shown above), for example, which sets itself apart with an innovative origami-style kickstand that makes the display positively captivating to look at from the back and sides. LG’s OLED88Z9PUA (say that three times fast) also takes a new approach to the tired old TV stand by affixing the massive display to the top of a simple, elegant open shelf that sits on the floor instead of on a credenza.

 

Whatever form your next display takes, I honestly believe we’re approaching a time in which near-perfect performance is just taken for granted at any price. And when we get there, manufacturers won’t be able to use geeky specifications like nits and dynamic range and awful “smart TV” interfaces to sell displays anymore. What will define the luxury TV of the future is how it fits into your lifestyle, even when—or especially when—it’s turned off.

Dennis Burger

Dennis Burger is an avid Star Wars scholar, Tolkien fanatic, and Corvette enthusiast
who somehow also manages to find time for technological passions including high-
end audio, home automation, and video gaming. He lives in the armpit of 
Alabama with
his wife Bethany and their four-legged child Bruno, a 75-pound 
American Staffordshire
Terrier who thinks he’s a Pomeranian.

Luxury TVs Come on Strong at CES

Luxury TVs Come on Strong at CES

Samsung’s 75-inch Micro LED TV

In a time when you can get a free 50-inch 4K TV as an incentive to buy a smartphone (see below), it’s pretty obvious that larger-screen flat-panel televisions are no longer considered luxury goods. They’re a commodity, spit out en masse in specific shapes, colors, and sizes. And while you still have to pay more to get better performance, you don’t have to pay that much 

more to enjoy a pretty darn good-looking picture. Companies like Vizio and TCL have seen to that.

 

This presents a challenge for specialty dealers trying to design higher-end luxury AV systems with larger screens, especially now that many of those systems are moving out of dedicated theater spaces where front projection is the display method of choice. How do you incorporate these huge, often generic-looking boxes into a high-end media room in a truly elegant way?

 

In the world of luxury home entertainment, design matters just as much as picture quality. (I know videophiles may 

bristle at that statement.) Thankfully, as evidenced by the recent CES trade show, TV manufacturers like LG and Samsung haven’t forgotten this segment of the market. Both companies showed off some truly drool-worthy TVs that push the design envelope.

 

For the past few years, LG’s OLED TV lineup has been a great case study in how to sell to the high-end market, and this year’s line is no different. Purely from a performance perspective, the new C9, E9, and W9 series should all be pretty much the same (i.e., awesome).What you get as you move up the price chain are design enhancements.

 

The entry-level C9 has a pretty straightforward look, the step-up E9 has a nicer picture-on-glass aesthetic, and the W9’s “wallpaper” design puts all the electronics in a separate box to give you that gloriously thin, sexy form that OLED promises. This year, LG upped the ante even further by adding a flagship Z9 that increases both the resolution (to 8K) and the maximum screen size (to 88 inches, a first for OLED) to appeal to customers who want a larger, more immersive screen.

Luxury TVs Come on Strong at CES

But the design that really had everyone talking was LG’s new rollable OLED TV (shown above). The screen hides inside a stylish metal cabinet until you’re ready to watch it, at which point it gracefully rolls up into place. We’ve been teased by the promise of rollable OLED for a while, but this is a real-world product that will ship this year, albeit only in a 65-inch screen size.

 

Samsung’s “The Frame” and Serif TVs, which cater specifically to the more design-conscious shopper, have been around for a while. But this year the company is putting its flagship QLED performance into them, which means you’ll get the best of both worlds: Performance and design. The Frame, in particular, is a cool, well-executed concept.

 

One of the most promising and potentially game-changing TV technologies is Samsung’s Micro LED, which can combine the thin form and gorgeous black levels of OLED with the high brightness levels of LED/LCD. But perhaps the most enticing feature for the 

luxury market is that the tech is both modular and scalable. At this year’s show, Samsung displayed a 219-inch Micro LED display dubbed “The Wall,” but also a more real-world 75-inch model. (Getting the Micro LED modules down to smaller sizes is the current challenge.) You’re also not locked to a 16:9 aspect ratio—you can configure the display

however you want, à la a video wall. Check out this video from the show (above).

 

So, can a TV still be a luxury item? Heck yeah it can. I, for one, am really excited to see these new designs come to life in real-world settings.

—Adrienne Maxwell

Adrienne Maxwell has been writing about the home theater industry for longer than she’s
willing to admit. She is currently the 
AV editor at Wirecutter (but her opinions here do not
represent those of Wirecutter or its parent company, The New York Times). Adrienne lives in
Colorado, where she spends far too much time looking at the Rockies and not nearly enough
time being in them.