Techorating–It’s a Thing

Techorating--It's a Thing

Samsung’s “The Frame” TV 

How long have you dealt with that stack of black boxes perched somewhere within the vicinity of your TV or those strands of spaghetti snaking across the floor to connect this widget to that widget? Maybe you’ve been living in this high-tech state of disarray so long that you’ve started to turn a blind eye toward these and other eyesores.

 

It’s time to stop and do something about it. Your house doesn’t have to look this way. Stereo equipment shouldn’t clash with the cool paint colors on the walls and wiring shouldn’t crinkle up the carpet. Really, there’s no reason that any type of

technology should overpower the cosmetics of any room of your house.

 

In fact, when infused appropriately into the design of your home, things like speakers, cable boxes, security cameras, and remote controls can actually make your house look better than it ever has . . . and make it perform a lot better to boot.

 

How?

 

The secret behind maintaining a clean, uncluttered appearance inside a home occupied by technology is teamwork. Don’t worry—this type of teamwork requires no uncomfortable hugs, handholding, or pep talks. In a home where the goal is to have design and technology work in harmony, you’ll need the teamwork of two very important home improvement professionals: An interior designer and a home technology specialist

 

These two people may seem like an unlikely duo, but when they come together amazing things can happen. Naturally, 

the interior designer’s objective is to turn your house into to an aesthetic masterpiece by applying new textures, colors, and furnishings and revamping architectural elements. Meanwhile, a tech specialist wants to improve the way your home performs through the installation of high-caliber music and video systems, smart lighting and climate controls, and convenient, effortless automation features.

When these two goals are tackled independently, you might sacrifice design for technology or vice versa. But when the tech and design professionals devise and execute a plan together, you get the best of both worlds. That stack of black boxes standing next to the TV disappears, residing instead inside a specially built equipment closet. The TV? With teamwork, the screen can sink into beautifully crafted cabinetry that matches the rest of the woodwork. And cabling? Even speakers can be rendered virtually invisible by recessing them into the ceiling

(or anywhere else for that matter) and coating them with a shade of paint to match the mounting surface.

 

Some of the super-cool setups that happen when an interior designer and tech specialist come together for the common good of your home:

 

Elegant light switches: Faceplates in every color of the rainbow, even gold- and silver-plated, can complement the decorating scheme of a room and consolidate multiple switches under a single housing.

Seura’s TV Mirror 

Artsy TV screens: When the TV is on, you see video; when it’s off, the screen transforms into a work of art or even a mirror.

 

Hidden assets: Motorized lifts can tuck a video projector and screen into the ceiling when they’re not being used. In an instant, a home theater is able to convert back into a traditional family room. 

 

Bottom line: If you’re in the market for either a cosmetic or tech upgrade for your home, be sure to get both contractors on board from the get-go. They’ll be able to come up with a game plan that suits your needs for great-sounding music, jaw-dropping video, elegant lighting, and other smart-home amenities . . . as well as a beautiful, comfortable interior.

 

Lisa Montgomery

With more than 20 years under her belt covering all things electronic for the home, Lisa
Montgomery 
has developed a knack for knowing what types of products and systems
make sense for homeowners looking to update their abodes. When she’s not exploring
innovative ways to introduce technology into homes, Lisa breaks away from the electronics
world on a bike, kayak, or a towel on the beach.

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