Why Filmmaker Mode Matters

This week, at an event in Los Angeles, movie director Rian Johnson (Brick, LooperThe Last Jedi), introduced a new feature called Filmmaker Mode, which will appear on select TVs beginning in 2020. This might sound strikingly similar to pictures modes you already have on your TV, which go by names like “Cinema” or “Movie.” So what makes this different? “If you like movies,” Johnson said, “then Filmmaker Mode will make movies not look like poo poo.” Those are awfully big words. But, as it turns out, this new mode is actually a very simple enhancement.

 

Every TV already comes with all kinds of modes that have an impact—sometimes negative—on the picture. You might remember that at the end of 2018, Tom Cruise took to Twitter to post a video about the evils of motion smoothing, sometimes 

referred to as “The Soap Opera Effect.” This technology, which is also known as “motion interpolation” or “motion-compensated frame interpolation,” has been around for years, although it’s usually labeled with some slick marketing term on your TV such as “Auto Motion Plus,” “Clear Motion Rate,” “Action Smoothing,”  “Smooth Motion Effect,”  “MotionFlow,” “ClearScan,” or “TruMotion.” All of these terms really refer to the same thing: The process

of artificially creating frames of video and inserting them in between existing frames in your favorite movies or TV shows in order to reduce motion blur.

 

Reviewers, directors, cinematographers, editors, and cinephiles alike all urge the viewing public to turn off motion smoothing—which is often on by default—and other extra processing layered on by display manufacturers, and to instead set their displays to a basic set of standards meant to reproduce a movie as accurately as possible. But telling people how to defeat the various modes can be difficult and confusing given the kind of inconsistent jargon described above. Even as someone who reviews TVs, I would have to look up “ClearScan” and what it does to know whether I want it on or off. It sounds more like a TSA screening machine than a kind of picture processing.

 

Creatives and enthusiasts have been pushing to keep extra processing out of watching movies at home for as long as there’s been extra processing. But Filmmaker Mode is different, because all of the various forces—including the movie creators, the studios, and the display manufacturers—are all pushing together.

 

Simply put, Filmmaker Mode preserves the aspect ratio, frame rate, and color of the movie or TV show you’re watching so they match what was seen on the reference monitors used for post production as closely as possible. To do this, it sets the 

Why Filmmaker Mode Matters

correct color temperature on your display, turns off motion smoothing and other processing like sharpness and noise reduction, and makes sure the image isn’t stretched out.

 

It’s not yet clear how this will be implemented for the user, but, based on what was said at the UHD Alliance

event, it will likely be either a dedicated button on the display’s remote or—and this would be ideal—included in the metadata of a disc, stream, or download, so the display would turn on Filmmaker Mode (in other words, turn off all the extra junk) automatically.

 

Filmmaker Mode has been endorsed by Warner Bros., NBCUniversal, Amazon Prime, Vizio, Panasonic, LG, and dozens of household-name movie directors, including Martin Scorsese and Christopher Nolan. Vizio has announced that its 2020 line of smart TVs will include the new mode, and there are rumors that manufacturers are looking into adding it to existing displays through firmware updates. If you’re wondering how that’s possible, most modern UHD/HDR TVs can already do all of the things Filmmaker Mode does—but only if you’re willing to dig through all the menus and dial in a dozen or more settings.

 

The biggest issue facing Filmmaker Mode won’t be getting manufacturers to include it with their products. Similar modes already exist, such as the Netflix Calibrated Mode on Sony displays. The challenge will be educating the public about why they should care enough to push this button (which is why the idea of it being included in metadata is so enticing to me). Or maybe Maverick can post some more videos on Twitter about the Filmmaker Mode button to let people know it’s there.

John Higgins

John Higgins lives a life surrounded by audio. When he’s not writing for Cineluxe, IGN,
or 
Wirecutter, he’s a professional musician and sound editor for TV/film. During his down
time, he’s watching Star Wars or learning from his toddler son, Neil.

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